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Podcasting Luminaries: Wayne Henderson

podcasting luminary wayne henderson host his podcasts at libsyn

Our Podcasting Luminaries Series features podcasters that have been producing content for at least 6 years and sometimes more!

In the world of podcasting consistency and longevity are two of the most elusive and coveted qualities. Learn tips and insight about podcasting plus get inspired by how podcasting has served as a launching point for greatness

Can we say prolific? This week’s podcast Luminary is just that. Wayne Henderson has been podcasting since August 2005.

He has four podcasts: The Packers Fan Podcast - the show by, and for, fans of the 13-time world champion Green Bay Packers NFL team. FRiNGEcasting With Wayne And Dan - devoted to the Fox tv show FRiNGE. Christmas Memories Past and Present - a seasonal podcast, coincidentally focused on Christmas memories from the past and the present. Tuning In With Wayne Henderson - his first podcast, covers a variety of subjects, and was the launchpad for his other podcasts.

And that’s not all!

He’s also previously and/or periodically produced: LOSTcasting With Wayne And Dan - popular podcast devoted to the best show to ever appear on television, ABC’s LOST. The Voice-Over Journey - sharing advice found from his voice-over journey career, as well as the advice from other voice actors, in all different stages in their careers.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I podcast, not only for fun, but also for the enjoyment in interacting with like-minded fans the the things I podcast about. At the same time, I do want to monetize my efforts.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has created all kinds of opportunities for me personally and professionally. Not only has it brought additional attention to my voice-over business, but I’ve received some mind-blowing feedback from listeners around the world.

In addition, some of my shows’ raving fans have sent me care-package gifts from Comic-Con, and one fan even gave me a free ticket to see a Green Bay Packers game at Lambeau Field!

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Focus on your listeners, no matter how small the audience may seem at the time. Enjoy the interactions with your listener community by every means possible: Email, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

Podcasting has played a very important part in the promotion of my voice-over business. It has helped create some income generating opportunities for voice-over jobs, as well as some consulting and speaking engagements for me as well.

The speaking and consulting gigs were really fun for me, and made me get out of my “comfort zone” of being behind the mic. I hope to do more of those types of things in 2013!

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you see podcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

After being “on the air” in broadcast radio for a number of years, working for low pay, all while not having much of a creative outlet, I came across a newspaper article in early 2005 about a man in my area doing voice-overs and podcasts from his home studio.

I was instantly struck by the idea of podcasting, and have been hooked from that moment! After a few months of research, and a few paydays of equipment investments, I started bringing my dreams of providing entertaining shows from my home to life!

At the same time, I knew that I could record quality voice-overs for other businesses and podcasts from that same home studio set-up.

Right now, I am excited for the upcoming football season and how my Packers Fan Podcast will be following the Green Bay Packers this year! In addition, with this being the final season of FRiNGE on Fox tv, it will bring additional focus to my FRiNGEcasting With Wayne And Dan podcast.


Wayne has so much amazing content + he’s a great guy, you should very much consider checking it out. If you have any feedback for him please send an email over to feedback(at)mediavoiceovers(dot)com or call (904) 469-7469


You know it’s time for you to start your own podcast!

   

Podcasting Luminaries: Hutch Jr. From Burghs Eye View

burghseyeview

Our Podcasting Luminaries Series features podcasters that have been producing content for at least 6 years and sometimes more!

In the world of podcasting consistency and longevity are two of the most elusive and coveted qualities. Learn tips and insight about podcasting plus get inspired by how podcasting has served as a launching point for greatness


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

My name is Hutch Jr. and I’ve been producing BURGHSEYEVIEW since October of 2006.

The show started out chronicling the high school football career of Hutch III but morphed into a purely Pittsburgh show. I was chased out of town in the early 80’s due to the unemployment situation at the time and became part of Steeler Nation.

I was gone for 20 years and longed for anything Pittsburgh every one of them. The show is for folks like me who are living in Nebraska yearning for a chipped ham sammich.  Yinzers in exile.

We talk history, local news and straight banter. We’ll have a beer and sometimes don’t delete the expletives. A young lady named Shell is my regular cohost as Hutch III is training to become an Army Lieutenant.

Episodes 16 - 40 were recorded on the way to or on location in Iraq. Some segments include the Pat Bus Vocabulary Moment, Things that Piss Hutch Off and earlier shows feature the Bloomfield Update.

Come get your Burgh on.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Some of the great voicemails and feedback we’ve received are from Holly who was listening and yearning from Zambia.

I actually got to meet her on a trip home (she brought Zambian beer!!), Alan from Ireland who is a great listener, but I missed him on a trip to Pittsburgh.

I always offer to send a Burghseyeview calendar to any listener who lives abroad and on his 3rd one he sent the show a picture with it mounted in his fathers office aboard an Irish Navy Vessel, pure awesome!

Getting feedback and meeting local podcasters is great too. Here’s a presentation we put on at Pittsburgh Podcamp 5 about the subject of keeping your show alive.

How have you promoted your podcast?

Facebook  and Twitter @burghseyeview have definitely increased our social media footprint and generated a lot of conversation.

I particularly enjoy the way Libsyn has been innovative lately with these venues being populated when an episode is published. Keep on experimenting with this, it cuts down on my work time!

What is your podcasting workflow?

My workflow consists of writing down goofy or great things that I see everyday on my iPhone “Notes”, then when it’s showtime I’ll sit down for a couple hours and gather more material online and from written sources and author the shownotes.

Shell will do her research, we’ll fill up the beers and head to the studio. A Ustream livestream is initiated for video and we start recording.

Shell handles the chatroom and I manage the video. The main show is audio, the video has evolved in the last year or so. 

What has changed the most in your show since you started?

Up until 2008 I would share conservative political opinions on the show, but after some negative feedback on iTunes comments we had a meeting and decided to take all non Pittsburgh related politics off the show and we did.

This created an opportunity for me to create another show with a friend Ward that I had met at a previous Podcamp.

The show is in it’s second year and if your looking for a conservative viewpoint Steel City Resistance (video) is for you.


You read it folks! If you’re up you wanna get your Burgh on, then you must SUBSCRIBE! If you wanna get your conservatism on, then try THIS. If you have any feedback for Hutch Jr please call 412-567-1460 or email burghseyeview(at)gmail(dot)com.


Are you ready to start podcasting?

   

Podcasting Luminaries: Jim Harold

amazing podcasting tips from the best

Our Podcasting Luminaries Series features podcasters that have been producing content for at least 6 years and sometimes more! In the world of podcasting consistency and longevity are two of the most elusive and coveted qualities. Learn tips and insight about podcasting plus get inspired by how podcasting has served as a launching point for greatness

Jim Harold created The Paranormal Podcast in 2005! In addition to his podcasting prowess, he also holds a Master’s Degree in Applied Communication Theory and Methodology and is accredited as a Certified Digital Media Consultant by the Radio Advertising Bureau.

He is very proud to have bootstrapped Jim Harold Media, LLC and associated projects to make them his full time profession.

If you want to learn more about Jim, read more right here


How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

the top podcast for the paranormal hosted on libsyn

I began podcasting in 2005 out of frustration. I had gone to school for broadcasting but ended up working in media but on the business side, never in front of the mic…this always bothered me. At 35 years old, I felt that I had lost the opportunity to pursue my dream career but thought I’d try this podcast thing.

Seven years later, I am a published author and am producing content full time.

I have had the privilege to co-host podcast series with two nationally known TV personalities (Kate Botello and Clayton Morris).

No podcast, no book deal…no podcast, no second career.

Granted, I am no Leo Laporte and money is tight but this is an incredible opportunity to do what I love for a living and to explore a topic which utterly fascinates me.

The paranormal has been a lifelong interest for me going back to watching “In Search Of…” as a kid. It is ALL because of podcasting.

When I went to school in the late 80s & early 90s for broadcasting, you were at the mercy of station owners, program directors, etc., to get an opportunity.

If I had gone to a station pitching my show back in ‘05, they would have laughed at me or, at best, tried to have sold me block time for thousands of dollars to have the privilege to air my show at horrible hours reaching an audience limited to a small geographic area!

Now I produce some of the top rated paranormal-oriented podcasts in the world…podcasting has meant everything to me professionally. It saved me.

What advice would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Look at people like Cliff Ravenscraft, Marc Maron, me (to a much lesser extent), and others who have transformed their careers and lives via podcasting. If you produce good stuff then you will be found and grow.

Some people consider me an overnight success, in terms of going full time, but it took seven years! another great podcast from Jim Harold hosted on libsyn

Don’t podcast if it is just to make money, you could probably do a lot better selling cars or real estate BUT if you love doing it, love the topic, and think you could make a business of it…go for it.

Also, podcasting as a hobby (which it was essentially for me for the first few years) is a very honorable and rewarding pursuit as well!

Most shows won’t immediately “hit”, but if you super serve a niche you can make an impact.

Produce weekly, don’t worry about having the best equipment from day one BUT make sure that you make what you have to work with sound as good as it can.

I started with a USB headset, Audacity, and a Libsyn account (of course!)…with that I was able to build a following and upgrade my equipment as I went along.

Note, things did not start to fully “catch” for me until I started to get super consistent with weekly production which wasn’t until 2008.

My tips include: CARE ABOUT YOUR AUDIENCE, produce every week, super serve a niche, produce great content, be yourself, maximize the sound quality through technique not by necessarily having thousands of dollars worth of equipment and educate yourself constantly.

Don’t be intimidated by the tech…basically other than my broadcast training everything I have learned technically to produce and distribute the shows, I taught myself. The information is all out there, most of it for free on the Net.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary.

Hardware

Windows 7 Desktop (self built), Heil PR 40 with pop filter, shockmount and mic arm, Onyx Blackjack USB Interface

Software

Adobe Audition 5.5, Powergramo, WordPress, Levelator 2 (GREAT), Vodburner (to record video podcasts)

Services

Libsyn – I cannot overstate how great Libsyn has been. I continue to use them for all of my media serving needs for my free podcasts. You can’t go wrong with their plans and uptime is excellent.

I remember talking to the founders when the company first started and I really admire what they’ve done for podcasters.

Skype – I record directly to my computer using Powergramo. Some folks don’t care for recording directly into the computer but it has worked great for me for the last seven years.

podcasting great Jim Harold hosts with libsyn

Note, I am religious about backing up my interview in case a hard drive crashes. Each recording is set to auto backup as soon as I hang up. I’ve never lost an interview (fingers crossed).

My setup is not the most sophisticated, by far. In time I may upgrade to a full blown mixer and recording “live to tape” to reduce post production time.

When I started I had a really underpowered computer, a fairly slow DSL connection, a USB headset, Audacity (FREE), and a Libsyn account.

I started by taking what little equipment I had, making it sound the best it could and then using the proceeds from my efforts to fund my upgrades. So, slowly over time I upgraded my technique and my equipment.

If you have an internet connection, $15 a month for a Libsyn account, a computer and a passion for doing an audio podcast there is no reason not to get started today.


How about it guys? Are you interested in the paranormal? You REALLY need to check out Jim’s programs over at jimharold.com and weirdnewsradio.com.


You know you want to start podcasting.

   

Podcasting Luminary: Terry Fallis

podcasting advice from the most successful podcasters


Our Podcasting Luminaries Series features podcasters that have been producing content for at least 6 years and sometimes more! In the world of podcasting consistency and longevity are two of the most elusive and coveted qualities. Learn tips and insight about podcasting plus get inspired by how podcasting has served as a launching point for greatness

Terry Fallis has been navigating the world of podcasting since 2006, starting off delving into the world of Public Relations and continuing by voicing his award winning and highly successful novels. He is currently in the midst of podcasting his latest novel, Up and Downwhich McClelland & Stewart will publish next month.

Terry Fallis is the author of The Best Laid Plans, and The High Road, satirical novels of Canadian politics. His debut novel (TBLP) was originally self-published in 2007 and won the 2008 Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour. Then McClelland & Stewartpublished TBLP in September 2008.

He also won the Gold Medal in the Independent Publisher Book Awards in the Regional Fiction – Canada East category. In 2010, the Waterloo Region chose The Best Laid Plans as the One Book, One Communityselection.

In February, 2011, The Best Laid Plans was crowned the winner of CBC Canada Reads as the “essential Canadian novel of the decade.” In November 2011,CBC-Television announced that The Best Laid Plans is indevelopment as a six-part TV miniseries.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

My first podcast, Inside PR, was really for fun and to explore the emerging world of podcasting and social media. My podcast novels were and are intended to build an audience for my writing in the hopes that satisfied listeners might actually remove their ear buds and buy the novels in their printed form.

When did you start podcasting?

I started podcasting in April 2006 when a colleague and I created the public relations podcast known as Inside PR. It was and remains a weekly podcast. I gave up the microphone in the spring of 2010 after four years and over 200 episodes, though the show continues.

In January 2007, prior to publication, I podcast my first novel, The Best Laid Plans, chapter by chapter. In the summer of 2010, I podcast my second novel, The High Road, in the same fashion. Currently, I’m in the middle of podcasting my third novel, Up and Down, chapter by chapter even though it won’t hit bookstore shelves until later in September.

Why did you start podcasting?

Initially, we started the Inside PR podcast as a way to explore the emerging world of social media while giving back to our profession.

Podcasting my novels has always been about building and sustaining an audience for my writing. I truly believe that by giving away the audio version of my novels for free and building a following behind them, I have actually sold more copies of the printed book.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

It was a thrilled to receive an email sent from a listener stuck in a massive traffic jam in Shanghai who had just listened to and enjoyed Chapter 9 of my first novel podcast a mere 90 minutes after I uploaded from my Toronto home.

What’s your podcasting setup? Hardware, software, CMS, etc.

I record using an Apex radio-style condenser mic through a Samsung Zoom H4 digital recorder. I then edit and produce each chapter in Audacity before exporting as an mp3 for uploading to Libsyn and my blog

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

At the very beginning back in 2006, we used to record through a four track board right into our computer. But eventually we discovered we get the best sound quality recording through condenser mics into a good quality digital recorder (in my case, a Samsung H4 Zoom) and then editing/producing in Audacity.

How have you promoted your podcast?

I use various social media platforms to promote the Up and Down podcast, including Facebook, Twitter, and my blog at www.terryfallis.com.

What do you know now that you wish you knew when you started?

I’m glad I figured out that when I make a mistake when recording a chapter, I should just keep the same recording going rather than stopping and then starting again, thereby ensuring that I am left with only one track to edit rather than many to piece together.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

The positive listener feedback to my first podcast novel gave me the resolve to self publish which led to winning one of Canada’s oldest and most prestigious literary award, the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, and then the CBC’s Canada Reads competition. So I think podcasting really helped to change my life as a writer.


What are you waiting for? Go subscribe to Terry’s UNRELEASED novel (at the time of this writing) Up and Down! If you want to reach out to Terry you can do so at tfallis(at)gmail(dot)com.


Are you ready to start podcasting?

   

Podcasting Luminary: My Take Radio

My Take Radio podcast hosted with libsyn the best podcast host


Want a little mature discussion about MMA, Gaming, Movies, Wrestling and Tech? Well, this week’s Podcast Luminary will fill that need completely. Podcasting since 2006, with a bit of a hiatus in between, My Take Radio is still going strong!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I started this show for fun much like any podcaster/internet broadcaster but when you realize that people actually tune in droves to hear your words you realize that fame and possibly profit can be attained. For me it has been a gradual progression in goals to where I still enjoy it but definitely want to make some money. There is a future in this medium and I want to be a part of that in a big way.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

When I started way back in 2006 it was just a USB headset and audacity. I had no idea what I was doing but managed to crank out quite a few episodes. My set up has evolved considerably with a mixer, XLR mic and noise gate to make the audio crisp.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Social media has been tremendous for our growth. Not only is the engagement with listeners more direct but it allows us to meet broadcasters with similar motivations that can share feedback and advice. Social media has also been instrumental in booking certain guests.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

I chose to answer this question because we have a very different work flow than most. We broadcast live every Thursday via two live services. For the live broadcast we do our show prep over the course of the week using Microsoft OneNote which allows us to prep remotely should we need to.

In terms of audio I broadcast using an Alesis 8 channel USB mixer and an AudioTechnica USB/XLR mic. I maintain a quiet environment using a Behringer compressor/noise gate which keeps my audio level and eliminates most ambient noise.

I record the show to a Zoom H2 which is then edited with Audacity for use on Libsyn. The WAV file is finalized to a 96k mp3 and tagged with artwork prior to upload. Any clips or sound effects are handled either with my iPad using a sound board app or via my PC with Pod Producer or other soundboard software.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Download numbers matter to a degree but you can’t make them your priority. If you intend to seek out advertisers then you definitely need to monitor them. Audience engagement comes first though.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

I advise any podcaster that is new or existing to press on and do it for enjoyment and not for profit. If you expect to get rich then you need a new hobby. Speak to members of the community and get as much feedback on your product as possible. While you think your product is good the fact is that there is always room for improvement.

For newbies I recommend getting 10-20 shows under your belt before making huge investments and purchases. Nothing is worse then finding out that something is not for you after you’ve spent a decent amount of money. Most important though is ensuring you have a site or blog where people can learn about you. Once your home is ready then you start increasing your social media presence.


Ready to support the show? Go ahead and subscribe to My Take Radio!


Ready to start your own podcast? Why not start right here

   

Podcasting Luminary: Wayne Brekke

libsyn podcast the necronomicast

Six years, five podcasts later and still going strong. Wayne Brekke is the embodiment of the best in a podcaster: passionate, multi-faceted, with a wide array of interests plus a microphone :)

Currently producing three widely different podcasts: The Necronomicast, 5 O’clock Lifestyle and World’s of Wayne, it’s guaranteed that you’ll be interested in something that he’s producing.

But, let him tell you a little bit about himself…


Q & A with Wayne Brekke


When did you start podcasting?

I started podcasting about 6 years ago with my first show Worlds of Wayne. Since, I have produced 5 podcasts and now have 3 active ones.

I host Worlds of Wayne and co-host/produce The Necronomicast as well as 5 O’clock Lifestyle.  

Why did you start podcasting? 

I started podcasting because of my love/hate relationship for radio. I had some radio experience, but hated the industry.

I had a friend of a friend who had a successful podcast and I thought it was a great thing. I was also (and still am) a freelance writer and would get interviews with all sorts of national acts coming through town.

I figured since I was recording the interviews anyway, I could use them for a show. Sure enough, my first podcast ever was an interview with Blues Traveler. Since then I have enjoyed creating podcasts, developing shows, and being a part of the podcast community.

What’s your show about?

Currently my newest show is called The Necronomicast. It is a horror based podcast hosted by myself and co-host Tim Welch. Tim is also a makeup artist and the state representative for the charity Scares That Care. We both have helped organize the local Omaha Zombie Walk as well.

We interview a variety of actors, stuntmen, and industry professionals as well as provide commentary on movies and television in the horror/sci-fi genres.

We have been lucky enough to have actors from movies such as Hellraiser, Friday the 13th, Halloween, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, My Bloody Valentine, as well as cast members from The Walking Dead and SyFy’s Face Off.   I initially created the show because I loved horror and couldn’t find a show I really liked. We have taken care to create a great quality show and do interviews that make the guests seem comfortable.

We hope to be able to hold online auctions to help raise money for Scares That Care as many of our guests have sent us autographs for donations. We have lots of great interviews happening and have even added a west coast correspondent to broaden our reach.

Worlds of Wayne is a variety show with guests that range from musicians, psychics, authors, comedians, and whoever else I can get.

5 O’clock Lifestyle is a show I host with my wife Laurie about entertaining, cocktails, appetizers, food, travel, and the general commentary we have at happy hour.

What’s your podcasting set-up? Hardware, software, CMS, etc. 

  Currently I use 4 Nady SCM 900 condenser microphones, a 4-channel Mackie board, Powerplay Pro 4-channel headphone mixer, BlueMax compressor, and Audacity for my recording. Our blog page is a modified version of a Libsyn template.

How have you promoted your podcast? 

I do everything I can to promote my shows including social networking, merchandise, promo swapping with other podcasters, getting involved with the community (ie. Presented at an awards ceremony as host of Worlds of Wayne), reaching out to local publications, asking our interviewees to repost and share, staying in touch with my listeners, and anything else I can think of. Even doing interviews like this one!

What do you know now that you wish you knew when you started?

That’s a hard question as I have enjoyed the process and progression that I have made in tandem with how podcasting has grown.

I have a few things I wish I knew now and am always learning. Always. I continually research and listen to podcasts about podcasting.

Of course now I am getting sponsors and donations so the next level seems to be coming quickly. I do it for fun and I think that is what I wanted initially.


Wayne would love to hear from you! necronomicast (at) gmail (dot) com, and make sure that you check out and subscribe to his shows, The Necronomicast, World’s of Wayne and 5 O’clock Lifestyle. You know, you could always offer some voice feedback at 347.762.5750.      

   

Podcasting Luminary: Dave's Lounge

The best music podcast Dave's Lounge is hosted with libsyn

If you’ve been a long time fan of podcasting and music, you’ve bound to have found Dave’s Lounge. Dave’s Lounge is perhaps the most versatile and accessible music podcast out there.

By versatile I mean that it can be played almost anywhere. You can listen while you work, when you want to relax, you can play it during a party, it can be played in the office, or while you’re stuck in traffic and it will always serve you in different ways.

If you love down-tempo and trip-hop, it really is a no brainer.

This podcast is a must subscribe. It’s guaranteed that at some point it will be the perfect podcast to play.

Bonus: Dave Warner, the host of Dave’s Lounge, has a deep resonant voice, he is incredibly passionate about what he does, and has awesome insights about life and music in general. He is celebrating his 7th Anniversary episode. Help him celebrate by subscribing!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

When I started Dave’s Lounge, I just did it to share some indie music I had found and really liked. The feedback I got was enough to keep me going, not to mention the free music and the contacts I’ve made over the years. As time went on, I started exploring ways for the show to make a few bucks, mostly through affiliate advertising at first, then finally opening it up to listener donations. Most of my listeners seem to prefer the ad-free, listener-supported model.

It only took a year or so for Dave’s Lounge to become a profitable hobby, but even seven years in, it’s still just a hobby. I’m hoping this will change soon with the launch of the Dave’s Lounge Premium Podcast this month. Still, it’s always been fun to find good new music and share it with people. Sometimes just the fact that I can do that legally keeps me going.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Most people just thank me for helping them get through their work day or their commute. I had one listener, though, thank me for helping him keep a level head while he was going through chemotherapy. He sent me a very nice photograph he took in Italy as a gift. I’m still surprised by how big an impact this little show can have on some people. I chalk it up to the power of the music more than anything.

I also had one artist that I play semi-regularly on the show tell me a few years ago that I was responsible for about 25% of her sales. That was quite an eye-opener.

Do download numbers matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

I’m finding more and more that engagement is much more crucial than raw numbers, because engaged listeners will help you spread the word about your show.

Download numbers don’t tell me how people listen to Dave’s Lounge, how they found it, or what songs they like the most.

Keeping a good dialog with your audience will do much more for growing your podcast in the long run – especially when you’re like me and you’re doing a show on a budget too small to afford advertising!

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Back when I started the show in 2005, I contacted other podcasters about doing bumpers for my show. One of them was Jamie Mottram, who at the time was doing the Sports Bloggers Live podcast for AOL.

I mentioned to Jamie that I was also doing a football blog at the time, and that led me to being a semi-regular guest on that show and, eventually, a writer for two years at FanHouse, AOL’s sports blog.

That gig paid off my credit card bills and paid for my trip to the New Media Expo in Las Vegas in 2008.

The biggest benefit of the show itself, though, has been all the great music I’ve gotten over the years. People recognize this show has a dedicated listener base that loves trip hop and downtempo music, and they want their music to be part of that – and if it’s good, it will be.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

First off, whether you’re starting a podcast, a blog, a YouTube channel, or even a Tumblr, keep your focus on a topic that excites you personally. If you’re passionate about something, that will come through in your show, and it will keep you engaged in doing your show regularly.

Second, keep as regular a schedule as possible. Consistency is important with any media, and it’s doubly important in an age where there’s so many media options out there for people to choose from. If they can rely on you to put on a good show every week or every other week, they’ll keep coming back.

Third, always look for ways to keep your listeners engaged with you, because your listeners will ultimately be the ones who sing your show’s praises to their friends. That’s how your audience grows.

Finally, if you’re looking to get rich right away from podcasting,llb you’re doing it wrong. Podcasting is a long game. It took Leo Laporte years to get where he is now, and he was a seasoned professional with a keen understanding of how media works.

I’ve been doing this for seven years, and honestly, I still haven’t figured it out. Still, I do Dave’s Lounge because I want to do it and because artists and listeners alike enjoy it, not because it makes me money.

This doesn’t mean I’ll stop looking for ways to make the show even more profitable, of course, but if you’re doing something just for the money, you’ll get tired of it in a hurry – especially if it’s not successful right away. If you love what you do and do it well, though, the money will come soon enough.


Get your day going by listening to the Dave’s Lounge 7th Anniversary Mix! And of course then promptly SUBSCRIBE.

Dave has just launched a Premium edition of his podcast, higher-quality version of the show that includes chapter markers, album art, embedded links to songs, and no voiceovers in the mix. Good stuff! Check it out


Ready to get your podcast going? Do it with the best podcasting host around! Start here

   

Podcasting Luminary: Chaz Rough From YOGAmazing

YOGAmazing is hosted with the best libsyn


Chaz Rough has been podcasting constantly for over 6 years. He has been, from the get go, committed to his audience. He was, if not THE first yoga podcaster, one of the first. He was also a pioneer podcaster in the entire health genre.

At this time the health genre in iTunes has multiplied by thousands, but Chaz’s YOGAmazing STILL remains one of the featured podcasts every week, outranking some of the better known yoga and health/wellness brands such as Yoga Journal and Oprah! You can check out below the key to his success.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I began the podcast at the recommendation of one of my yoga students. Actually, I didn’t want to do a yoga podcast in the beginning, I just didn’t think it was the right thing for me, but at the continued urging of my friend I began the YOGAmazing Video Podcast.

No budget, no camera and no experience with video editing.

I used a Kodak digital camera that shot bad video, 15 frames per second and iMovie.

Slowly as I learned the basic fundamentals of filming and editing, I stumbled upon how my show was to be formatted and I still use the same format today.

In time I bought better cameras, I now use the canon xa10 and the canon 7D with Final Cut Pro.

I eventually developed a marketing strategy for YOGAmazing that enabled me to have sponsors such as Coca-Cola, Disney, Zone  Perfect health bars and Saturn cars.

In the six years since I started the podcast, I’ve had millions of downloads and I now offer my video/marketing services to companies that want to get their product noticed online in social media and video channels.

yogamazing artwork

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

15 years ago I got into yoga after I was laid off from my job. I was also a musician. I saw that Sting practiced, so I began practicing yoga.

Fast forward fifteen years later and one day I was on my twitter account and Sting, yes, Sting, the man himself subscribed to my YOGAmazing twitter feed with his personal twitter account.

I about had a cow, I was speechless, but I thought it was cool that the man who got me into yoga was now following me on twitter. Now that’s going full circle.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going?

If I could offer any advice to a new Podcaster I would recommend one important thing…. Consistency of product.

Over the past six years I have never missed a weekend class, not once. My audience knows that I deliver every week and for a podcast producer that is the ticket.

Create content that you’re passionate about and deliver it on a consistent basis. It’s not about the camera or the gear, it’s about your passion and if people see that they will subscribe.

Just be yourself and do what you do and all will come in time.


Wanna get your yoga on? SUBSCRIBE to YOGAmazing today :)


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Podcasting Luminary: The Jersey Beat Podcast

the jersey beat podcast

Want new music from New Jersey and beyond? Then you must check out Jim Testa’s The Jersey Beat Podcast. He’s been producing his podcast for 6 years this month! Let’s celebrate his 6 year anniversary by subscribing or leaving a comment below :)


Fun, fame, or profit?

The first Jersey Beat podcast went online in April, 2006. We recently posted our 91st episode. The podcast was a natural outgrowth of Jersey Beat, which I started publishing as a print fanzine in April, 1982, when there were no personal computers or Internet (my first issue was created with a manual typewriter, some rubber cement, and press-on letters for headlines.)

About the time I started the podcast, it became financially impossible to continue publishing the print zine so I converted to a web zine/music blog called JerseyBeat.com, which I also still do. The podcast has always been an extension of the fanzine, in that I play mostly local (NJ/NYC) music with the occasional interview or commentary.

I’ve always done this for fun, although I suppose I have achieved a small measure of fame out of it. And my visibility as a music writer in the zine has led to opportunities as a freelance writer, so I’ve indirectly earned some money out of it too. We sold ads in the print zine but always just enough to barely break even and cover the costs of printing and mailing.

I’ve never sold advertising on the Jersey Beat website or solicited commercials for the podcast. Podcasting has changed enough that if a sponsor I approved of came along at this point, I would welcome the financial support. But I still wouldn’t take, say, cigarette or hard liquor advertising.

What has changed most in your recording setup since you started?

I had always been a PC person. We used PC’s at work and I basically taught myself personal computing, from the first monochrome early DOS computers through the introduction of Windows and all the other advances as they occurred. So when I started my own podcast in 1987, I naturally used a PC.

A friend recommended a program called Cast Blaster that I bought for $50, and I jerry-rigged a microphone through a small pre-amp that plugged into the soundboard of my PC.

Cast Blaster discontinued the software and replaced it with something called Studio Rack, which I didn’t like at all. So I went on eBay and bought a used iBook-series laptop for $250.

A friend of mine installed the latest OS and Garageband for me and I taught myself how to use it. I’ve had a couple different Mac laptops since then but I wouldn’t consider using anything today but Garageband.

I use the laptop’s built-in mic at home but I have a USB “Snowball” mic that I bring with me if I record live music or do the podcast from a remote location.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google , etc)

Yes, very much so. I created a Blogspot page for the podcast when I started it and use that to post my playlists. That also has a download link to my libsyn page and a button that lets you subscribe to the podcast from the iTunes store.

But I’ve found that using Twitter and Facebook to announce new episodes greatly increases the number of downloads and subscribers I get. It also lets me interact with the musicians I’m playing or whose music I would like to play.

Also obviously sites like Bandcamp, where bands give away their music for free, have pretty much completely replaced the old Podsafe Music Network, which I relied on heavily back in 1987.


   

Podcasting Luminary: Victor Cajiao

mac podcaster victor cajiao

Being a great teacher and having the ability to clearly explain anything in a digital format is not an easy thing to do. Through his high quality podcasts Typical Mac User, Typical Shutterbug and the new RangeFinder Moment Podcast, Victor Cajio shines as he dives deep into that which he his passionate about. He has the ability to break down and distill the most complex processes so that even the newbie listener can begin to understand and dive into the community.

You need not be a Mac lover or photography lover to get something from Victor’s podcasts. He is down to earth, articulate and can make things that you have no interested in pretty darn engaging.


the typical mac user podcast

Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

During the six plus years I have been podcasting, it’s been a little of each one of these. These days mostly for fun and back to the passion of why started podcasting in the first place.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Well, I don’t know if you consider this feedback, however I had a listener who started listening to my PC based show (Typical PC User) a very long time ago. She would write to me as she started learning about computers and wanted to become more and more educated.

She became a friend , a successful podcaster and now works at Libsyn. Elsie Escobar, was that listener, and I’m proud now when I see her tweet about information security and bit rates, to know that I made a difference in her ability to express her passion for Yoga and other things as well as build a career in podcasting. How cool is that?

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

typical shutterbug podcast I find the system to publish podcast a real gem. Libsyn is like an old trusted friend. Most of the time it just works. They have been supporting podcasters since the beginning and although they are not perfect, I find their service fills my needs.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Sure number matter for keeping score. However I’d rather have a smaller number of people listening who are engaged and build a community together (like I do in Typical Shutterbug) than a huge number of subscribers that might never listen.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

the rangefinder moment podcast I believe that I’ve gotten to be a respected member of the Apple podcast community as a result of my show(s). I have been able to speak at Blogworld, and Macwolrd Expo as well. Also thanks to the support of my sponsors, I’ve made enough money to buy all my gear, and I get to review wonderful and sometimes, not so wonderful products.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Run now while you can!! In all seriousness I think that if you think you are going to get rich in podcasting , then you are likely right. You social life will be richer, your ability to change one persons life will grow, your connection with the listeners will keep you going.


Subscribe to the Typical Mac User Podcast, The Typical Shutterbug Podcast or Victor’s newest off the hook podcast, the Rangefinder Moment Podcast. This podcast appeals to all those of you with a passion for rangefinder cameras, so if that’s you, give it a listen. If you have any questions for Victor, please contact him at typicalmediagroup (at) gmail (dot) com.


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Podcasting Luminaries: The Manic Mommies

The amazing Manic Mommies hosted at libsyn

Working mothers talking about motherhood, kids, life, parenthood and everything else! Who would have thought that it would be going on for 7 years this July. That is indeed impressive. Kristin and Erin the Manic Mommies have managed to consistently publish content, build raving fans, have a yearly Mom Escape which includes their listeners, all with some pretty awesome sponsors!

These ladies are truly Podcasting Luminaries! If you are a Mom or just thinking of becoming a Mom you MUST subscribe


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

The Manic Mommies podcast hosted at libsyn

Validation and community - Manic Mommies is a podcast for moms “managing the chaotic combination of work and family.” We started it as two working moms who were feeling very isolated and like we were the only ones struggling. Turned out we were not alone!

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

There have been so many moments - with our annual highlight being meeting listeners at our Manic Mommies Escape - but the one that comes immediately to mind was from a mother who, after hearing my son was diagnosed with dyslexia realized her daughter, who she always thought was “just like” my son, probably had the same learning disability. Several weeks later she was able to confirm through medical diagnosis.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

We are much more portable - using a portable Tascam audio recorder. The other big change is that Erin moved to Rochester New York, so we now connect through iChat, record our sides of the conversation on Tascam recorders, and I “merge” the sides in Garage Band.

The Manic Mommies and their sponsor Chevy

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

We feel that podcasting differentiates us even as mom blogs continue to grow. It also works perfectly with our audience, on the go moms!

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you seepodcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

Manic Mommies was started as experiment/sandbox through which I could learn about Social Media for my day job (Sundin Associates). It is only because of our amazingly loyal audience, and supporters like Chevrolet, that it became a business!


Interested in contacting Erin or Kristin, you can reach out to them via their listener feedback line 508 644 8434 and of course, remember to subscribe :)

If you are Mom and are looking to get away….Consider doing it with the Manic Mommies! They have a fantastic Mom Escape every year! This year’s event will be taking place on November 9-11.


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Podcasting Luminary: Don McAllister from ScreencastsOnline

another amazing podcast hosted at libsyn screencasts online

Seeing a genuinely great human being that happens to be incredibly talented succeed at making a living with podcasting is simply fantastic. Don McAllister is just that kind of human being. He is thorough, professional, personable and has a knack for great teaching.

He’s been podcasting since 2005, first as a hobby and as of 2006 it’s grown into one of the most high quality video podcasts around: ScreencastsOnline. If you have EVER had any questions about OSX or iOS I’m sure Don has covered it some way or another. You should subscribe to his free feed for some top-notch content, although being a premiums subscriber is truly worth it!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

All three! I’m fortunate in that podcasting has been kind to me and I’ve been able to make a living from doing something I love. It’s hard work, but I get to use the latest Mac gadgets, have achieved a certain amount of recognition in the Mac community and am able to make a good living from my weekly show.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

The podcast has been an enabler in establishing myself as known figure in the Mac community. This has lead to many speaking engagements in Macworld and other leading Mac events, as well as international travel as a MacMania speaker. In recent years I’ve visited China, South Korea, Japan, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and many European countries, all as a result of my podcasting career.

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you see podcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

When I started, I was in full time employment and podcasting was my hobby. I eventually found a way to make the transition away from my 9 to 5 job and become a full time Podcaster.

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

Initially, the podcast was completely free. In some respects, it was the audience that seeded the idea of converting to charging for premium content by offering donations. When I did launch the premium content, I kept the bulk of the content free, but over time, have transitioned to mainly premium content. I still have free content however. The audience reaction was overwhelmingly positive. In fact, I can only remember a single email from one disgruntled audience member who felt that everything should be free!


As well as subscribing to ScreencastsOnline, you should really check out Don’s FANTASTIC iOS apps geared to the newbie user: SCOTutor for the Mac, SCOTutor for Lion, SCOTutor for iPad If you have a family member or friend that’s a bit tentative about their new device, those are the apps to get them.

Interested in giving Don some feedback? You can do so by emailing Screencastsonline (at) gmail (dot) com.


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Podcasting Luminaries: Scott Sigler

scott sigler innovative podcaster and writer

Unbelievably talented and deeply committed writer Scott Sigler has been podcasting his incredibly addicting books since March 2005…mostly weekly!

He has been around the podcasting scene right from the beginning and continues to inspire through his commitment as an innovative writer, having turned modern-day publishing on it’s head by giving his books away for free (via podcast of course) and becoming widly successful because of it.

If you have not had a chance to listen to Scott’s addicting scifi/horror/thriller novels, you seriously have to.

In fact, just take a look at a little trailer for his book ANCESTOR…and the promptly SUBSCRIBE. You can start with that one and then there are tons more to choose from!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Probably some of each of those, but mostly because I write for a living, and therefore it’s my job to get my work out to the people who want to hear it. If I can do that effectively with a podcast, and that grows my audience, it lets me continue to entertain as my job for that much longer.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

Everything! As I became more seasoned at my job, and found a little success, I replaced microphones, moved to an office space so I could quit recording out of my bedroom closet, and even scored a full sound booth for free from a recording studio remodel a few years back!

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Yes and yes.  Download numbers help gauge what works in my podcasting, and audience engagement is really the point of the whole endeavor.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

No question about it.  I had EARTHCORE, my first novel that was professionally edited, ready to go but without a publisher in early 2005. Since it was a tight, clean story, I started to podcast it.  The success I found with EARTHCORE and ANCESTOR (the novel that followed) was very important to getting my Random House deal. 

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Record your first four episodes before you ever podcast a single one.  That way you’ll have consistency for at least a month, which is a big key to success.  If folks like what you’re doing, they’ll immediately want more.  If you don’t have it, they might not stick around until you do. However, once you hook them with several great episodes, they’ll keep coming back even if you have an off week here and there. 


And he has another one coming out! This one is called NOCTURNAL. It seems like it’s gonna be A MAY ZING. Of course you can pre-order the book, due out on April 3 as well as check out the coolest pre-order contests the he has going on!

If you wanna contact Scott you can email media(at)scottsigler(dot)com or call 206-666-4673


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Podcast Luminaries: Israelisms

Podcast Luminaries: Israelisms

If real, conversational, insightful and down to earth is your podcast style of choice, Israelisms has to be part of your library. This week marks the shows 6 YEAR ANNIVERSARY!!! Talk about commitment. Now that is impressive! Get to know Charley and Carol by subscribing!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Carol and I have done over 350 weekly episodes of Israelisms Podcast. We've tried it for fun, fame, and profit. Profit seems to be the only thing eluding us thus far, although our listeners have pitched in a few times monetarily when we've requested for certain things. Our audience is loyal and we know their lives would be empty without us. That's why we keep doing it.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

Our first podcast was when I handed Carol a set of headphones/mic connected to my Windows laptop along with a set for me, and I said to her, "Talk to me." From then on, we've been talking about regular life in Israel every week. Naturally, there's politics involved, and arguing, and laughing. Now we have a studio set up in a room in our house with mics and mixer and Garage Band. The one thing that's stayed constant is that we've used libsyn since day one. That's a long time!

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

One of the funniest experiences over the years happened when I was on the street in Jerusalem and I was talking to a friend of mine who I ran into. He had a friend with him who was visiting from the States. He didn't introduce us because it was only in passing. After a couple minutes, his friend interrupted and pointed at me and said, "You do a podcast, don't you?" I said I did. He said, "Omigod, you're Charley from Israelisms! I recognize your voice!"


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Podcasting Luminaries: C.C. Chapman

the amazing long time podcaster C.C. Chapman


We are so psyched and grateful to have the mighty C.C. Chapman as our Podcast Luminary this week! Talk about Luminary! C.C. has been podcasting since December 21, 2004.

C.C. is a guy of great integrity that continues to produce fantastic content having co-authored the best selling book Content Rules, established Digital Dads "the man cave of the internet" aka where a Dad can be a guy and Passion Hit TV "exploring the evolution of ideas we are passionate about into something profound".

Looking for inspiration? Tune into C.C. and you'll be charged right up!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

It has always been about the fun first because it takes a lot of time and energy to do it, so I think it has to start there.

I was fortunate to be involved from the very beginning so I have made money from podcasting and it has lead to great things. As one of the first professional podcasters that gave a certain level of exposure.

I suddenly was speaking about artists rights and podcasting at conferences all over the world. I remember when I got asked to go to Germany to present that I knew things were getting crazy.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

A couple of them instantly come to mind. You've got to understand that I'm most known for my music podcast Accident Hash and that I had a lot of passionate listeners that I called "homefrys."

In the first year of the podcast I got an e-mail from a student in Israel who thanked me for powering him through his studying. That was the day that I realized that I had listeners in every corner of the globe and that I had to keep that in mind.

The second was after I did a rather emotional show. The note told me how he had listened to that episode while sitting and watching the lights at Ground Zero. He was listening to my show while being torn up about what happened there. That is powerful.

I also do a show called Managing the Gray that is focused on being the best person you can be and finding success in life.

I was doing a live concert event in Nashville. It was a blast and there was a good size crowd there. In the corner was this older couple that looked a bit out of place. As I was walking by them, he stopped me and thanked me.

He was a listener and had recently quit his well paid executive job to go back to school and chase his dreams and he was inspired to do that from my words. That blew my mind! I'd love to know how he is doing these days.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

Not much actually. I still use the same microphone I bought back in the beginning because it has always served me well. I've always recorded live and not done post production so I try to keep it as simple as possible.

I do miss one thing and that is CastBlaster which was a great PC recording software. When I went Mac, I loved it so much that I installed Windows on my Mac for that single program. They stopped making it which still has me sad to this day.

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

From the very beginning Libsyn was the best place to host your files. Not having to worry about bandwidth limits at an affordable price is a concern of all podcasters.

I also loved that you've always had a great team who cares about their users so if something ever did go wrong, you could always get ahold of a human quickly and get it resolved. That is important.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Social Media is a crucial part of my life. Without it, most of the opportunities I've been able to take advantage of would have never come about.

In there early days of podcasting we didn't have all of the tools we do now. The first connections happened via call in lines and on the Podcast Alley message board. Today I use Twitter and Google+ a lot and of course Facebook as well. Everything on the web is now social so no matter what content you are creating, you need to share it and these tools allow for that.

Has podcasting helped you grow your business.

I make a living creating content, keynote speaking and consulting. Podcasting helps me with all of these because you never know who is listening and I've had more than one person tell me that they were forwarded a link to one of my shows as an example of my experise.

Audio is a very intimate connection with people because unlike video where they can tune out and only listen, with audio you are in their head. It is a great connection that people overlook all the time.

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

Realize that it is not magic.

You've got to build an audience and continually put out quality content. But, even doing that is not going to mean sponsors are going to line up. It takes a lot of work and asking to actually get money.

Over the years I've seen networks come and go and heard promises of quitting your day job based on podcasting and most of those were false promises. At the end of the day if you want to make money from your podcast it is on your shoulders to make that happen. It can and does happen, but it takes hard work on top of the actual recording to make it happen.


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Podcasting Luminaries: Mur Lafferty

The amazing and multi-talented Mur Lafferty in addition to podcasting since December 2004 is also a writer, a gamer and martial artist. She infused the podcasting sphere with a je ne sais quoi kind of spunk that only she posesses. She is the co-author of Tricks of the Podcasting Masters as well as currently being the editor of Escape Pod magazine, the host of I Should Be Writing, and the host of the Angry Robot Books Podcast.


mur lafferty podcaster

Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

All, and in that order. I started for fun, got startled when my shows became popular, and then figured out a way to make some money from it.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

They're vital to spreading the word and building listeners. Twitter most of all.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has allowed me to interview many people in publishing, and that's created networking opportunities that have helped my career greatly.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Nothing happens overnight. Stick with it and don't be afraid to send promos to other podcasters for a boost.

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

I implemented a premium content system last year, and it's gone fine. no one reacted poorly, and many choose to support the show even if the site has hiccups or I am negligent with posting premium content.


You really should dive into some of Mur's work. Check out The Afterlife Series and ebooks you can get via Amazon.

If you wanna contact Mur you can do so at mightymur(a)gmail(dot)com.


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Podcast Luminaries: Evo Terra

What happened on October 14, 2004? Well, Evo Terra started podcasting, with the 40th podcast EVER (according to Podcast Alley). Kinda cool! Since then he's done some pretty awesome things, both as a podcaster and for podcasting. Have you read "Podcasting for Dummies"? Yep. Co-wrote that book. Currently he's co-founder and manager of podiobooks.com. Check out what he has to say.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Things have changed a lot for me, but fun and fame always take center stage. My voice personally comes and goes in the podosphere, but I'm deeply involved. As the co-founder and manager of Podiobooks.com, I'm helping media-savvy authors find a wider audience by mixing up self-created audio books and podcasting. Some authors credit their success at being a full-time writer to their working with Podiobooks.com. Knowing that makes me feel great!

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

There's an email pinned to my wall that I received well over 5 years ago. One of our listeners had just lost his daughter -- a pain I cannot even imagine. He claims to have found great solace by listening to back-episodes of our show. That show is now defunct, and the content certainly wasn't what you might consider inspirational, but it obviously gave him a much needed break from reality.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

From cheap, to pro, and back to cheap again! The equipment keeps getting better, less expensive and smaller. Give me and SM-58 and a Zoom H4n, and I'm good!

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

I once got an email from Wil Wheaton that said "most scifi podcasts suck. Yours does not." That was pretty cool. And then there was Cory Doctorow recommending our show to any author who wanted to get the word out about their book.

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

I really only have ever used Libsyn as a media host. The best friggin' media host on the planet, but that's about it.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

I got in early on the game with Twitter and am doing the same now with Google+. In both cases, I fully engaged. Tons of updates, tons of content, and a near-constant rate of poking at the edges to see how far things could be stretched. Social media engagement is a requirement today, not an option.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

I leave all the work to others. I know the drill (hey, I co-wrote Podcasting for Dummies), but I've always leaned on the hard work of others to do the pieces and parts. Me? I'm voice talent and a high-level concept guy. So my workflow is help figure out what needs to be said, record and excellent show, and then let someone else do the hard work.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Numbers always matter, but not always size. I'll take a dozen highly interested listeners over a thousand who don't care any day. But a few million? Well... I might change my mind then.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Wow. In every way possible. I landed me the gig writing Podcasting for Dummies. It's let me develop a strong professional speaking portfolio. It's helped me establish relationships and friendships with super-smart people. And it's given me enough personal klout to knock elbows with the best of 'em.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Listen, listen, listen. Then make something that is truly remarkable.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

Currently? Not so much. At least not measured directly. But that's because I don't have an active show with my voice.

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you see podcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

My partner and I were already doing syndicated radio shows. For us, podcasting was a natural (and easy) extension.

Has podcasting helped you grow your business.

Well, I'm no longer in that business. But I don't think I'd have nearly the work I do now with out it.

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

Focus on the indirect route. Making money from content is hard. You need a big audience for that, or you need to accept making not very much money. But used as a promotional/brand/platform building mechanism? That can work great! Just make sure you have plenty of options for someone to give you money once you've hooked them into your network.


If you want to contact Evo, please email feedback(at)podiobooks(dot)com

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Podcasting Luminaries: Marketing Over Coffee

marketing over coffee podcast

The essential marketing podcast for podcasters. No, Marketing Over Coffee is not podcaster specific, but Chris Penn and John Wall have been around for a while in this space (podcasting since 2005 to be exact) and have a wealth of information regarding marketing. They are consistent, highly knowledgeable and concise. In less than 30 minutes you'll be overflowing with actionable information that will do wonders for your podcast or whatever business you are in. Bottom line, you need to subscribe. We recently caught up with John Wall for our Podcasting Luminaries series. 


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I'd say Fun, Profit and Fame, in that order. It takes a long time to build a community so if it's not fun you'll flame out quick. Although the show itself has been break-even for the past couple of years, we've both managed to accelerate our careers significantly because of the show.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

With Marketing Over Coffee going on 5 years we've had listeners that started with the show in College who now have jobs in the industry. It's great to know that the show has had such a positive impact for our listeners and the economy!

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

When we started Marketing Over Coffee we had already both been casting for a couple of years so we had our workflow just the way we liked it. The only thing that's changed is that the Marantz PMD-660 we used was destroyed during a party a few weeks back so I upgraded to the 661.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

Besides the Marantz Chris is on a Shure SM-58 and I use and ElectroVoice EV. I edit the audio in a wave editor called Goldwave for the PC, and run the file through the Levelator and SoundSoap for a consistent sound. I use Dreamweaver to write the HTML for the Wordpress Blog and the file is hosted by Libsyn, who also provides our App on both platforms.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

It's all about the impact the show has so the numbers aren't that important to us.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Tell the best story you can, there's a ton of average stuff out there but the most compelling stuff is tougher to find.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

It all started with the podcast for us. The LinkedIn group and the publications available on Amazon are growing, but the podcast is still the flagship.

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

We haven't had to charge for access thanks to our sponsors. This quarter the show is underwritten by GoPromos.com and MarketingProfs. You can also check out more content on Amazon between the Marketing Over Coffee Quarterly Report and Chris' Marketing White Belt: Basics for the Digital Marketer.


Wanna get some of your questions answered? email marketingovercoffee(at)gmail(dot)com or call the show 617-606-3661.

These guys are doing something really cool. Interested in their awesome marketing info but have no time to catch up on all the wisdom? Check out The Q4 Report, it's a 12 page report which covers all the Marketing and Technology topics covered at year end by Marketing Over Coffee. Great stuff.


Podcasting Luminaries: The Saintcast

The Saintcast

Have you ever wondered what the lives of Saints were like? Or have you ever been interested in knowing more about a particular Saint? The Saintcast is the right podcast for you. Each podcast is a torrent of inspiring saintly information, both to nurture your mind and soul. Paul Camarata has been bringing saints and sainthood into every day life since March 2006. If you ever need a bit of inspiration, check out this podcast.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I'm doing the show for fun, my own education and edification, and to help spread the word (in Catholic circles we use the term 'new evangelization') about the Catholic Christian faith and the great examples we have in living this faith in the real world - the Saints. I describe my reasons briefly here.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

I've had some incredible feedback through the years - wish I could write a book on it. When you feel that your days are long, you've got way too much on your plate, or you feel you are out there just talking to the air (?), you get that fabulous piece of feedback that keeps you going.

I've had many who told me they returned to the Church after hearing some of these stories, one that told me he and his son were 'riveted' to the podcast listening to the story of heroism of one of the martyred saints.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

I met my Archbishop a few years ago who showed me the SaintCast on his iPhone (Archbishop Joseph Naumann).

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

Libsyn three was a huge improvement, and the SaintCast App was incredibly helpful in building the brand. Try as we might, as podcasters we are 'narrowcasters' rather than 'broadcasters.' People have to go out there and actively download the podcasts.

The more we can make this passive, as in, download the App then the podcasts are pushed to your phones immediately, the more listeners we will accrue. I've definitely found that to be the case with the App. In addition the stats Libsyn provides are key, easy to understand. the Graphic interface is perfect for a snapshot look at your numbers.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Social media has been huge! Especially Twitter and Facebook. It simply takes one or two retweets to make your podcast known to a whole new segment of listeners.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

Workflow: Building/writing the script - doing research for each podcast, gathering feedback since last show, researching on the web, searching various saint related sites, conducing interview, editing sound files from remote recordings forming an outline of the show on a wordprocessing or outline program (Word, Pages, OmniOutliner) arranging/placing audio file, jingles, Skype interviews, cutaway and cutback music, etc. in Ubercaster Recording

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Don't get discouraged - use the tools that Libsyn has provided, and that one special feedback response will keep you going!


If you are interested in sending Paul some feedback or asking him some more questions you can email saintcast(at)sqpn(dot)com or call 312.235.2278.

As Paul mentioned there is The Saintcast App: Catholic Saints On Call for iOS as well as Android!


Podcast Luminaries: Internet Business Mastery


Podcasters are always looking for ways to make money, well, listen and subscribe to Internet Business Mastery and you'll be inspired and ready to rock it out. Make sure you go back at least a couple of years, the older episodes are still very relevant with a ton of fantastic and actionable advice. Having started podcasting in August 2005 Sterling and Jay are still fired up about what they do, are incredible teachers, and simply want you to live the best life you can.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

We produce our show for two primary reasons:

1) Fulfillment - We love talking about internet business. We love inspiring others. We have a mission to help others who want to gain more freedom and financial control in their lives by starting their own business.

2) Money - The show attracts most of our customers. We earn about $1014 per thousand downloads of our show. That money is earned from our membership site, coaching courses and affiliate commissions.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

I use a Heil PR 40. Sterling uses a Shure SM7. Both are awesome professional quality mics. We call each other on Skype since we don't live in the same state. We do a countdown and each start recording just our own voice on our computer using Sony Sound Forge.

These two audio files are sent to our editor to be synced and edited. This is called a double-ender. It makes us sound like we are in the same room and preserves the highest quality while still doing a remote recording. Once the editing is done, that file goes to our virtual assistant who posts the show and show notes to the blog on the prescribed date.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Just get started! Be consistent. You have to build momentum and it's hard to do that only producing content a couple times a month. Shoot for once a week. Do not try to be all things to all people. Know who it is that you want to attract. Define your ideal audience member. Speak to that person.

Choose a topic that you are passionate about. That will make your show more interesting for the listener and more fun for you. Also, if money is your goal, make sure you have another goal as well in terms of impact, creativity, personal fulfillment, etc. Money alone will not sustain you.

Has podcasting helped you grow your business.

Yes! Like I said above, most our customers come from finding the show online. Our business earns both myself and my co-host a nice six-figure income. We have had over a million dollars in sales from the show.

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

Create your own products. You can sell a coaching call series, premium audio/video, an e-book, a private membership or whatever else fits your audiences needs.

Survey them to find out what they want most. If you make money on advertising alone, you are leaving a lot of money on the table.


To get an immediate hit of Sterling and Jay, go to FreeAudioGift.com -3 Pillars of Lifestyle Design and check out the wealth of information that they have to offer. You can also send them a voice feedback at 877 877 7507.



Podcast Luminaries: Steve Stanger From The Mac Attack and iSee iShoot iPhone


Since August 2005 Steve Stanger has been sharing his unique voice with the Mac community via his podcast The Mac Attack. He is steady, clear and kind, an wonderful asset to the world of podcasting. Currently his passion for photography has taken him to creating iSee, iShoot, iPhone a podcast casting light on the magic of iPhone photography.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Fun, definitely for fun. The quick backstory. For awhile I had dual careers -- I.T. guy and radio (on-air and production). The I.T. gig paid the bills and the radio gig fed the part of my personality that needed to be creative and perform. When podcasting came around I had been out of radio for awhile and I was missing the production and broadcasting aspects of it (ask those close to me and they will tell you I was also missing hearing the sound of my own voice too). Podcasting sounded perfect. Originally I wanted to do a music show but knowing licensing was going to be an issue I decided to do a techie based, how-to Mac show and The Mac Attack was born. I had been a Mac user since the mid 80’s and I’m a certified Apple tech (and maybe just a bit of a fanboy) so the subject of the show was a no brainer.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Over the years I’ve heard from a few listeners that decided to pursue I.T. careers and get Apple certified because of discussions I’ve had on the show. The best thing you can do for your listeners is to be honest and share real experiences.

Do download numbers matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

At this point (for me) audience engagement is key. It’s really about sharing, doing a “brain dump” of information in creative and fun ways. In the beginning I was constantly checking my download numbers.

Let me tell you this -- it will make you crazy if you are just podcasting “for the numbers”.

If you want to have a rewarding experience podcasting really engage your audience. Don’t just use social media to post about new shows. Share info, start discussions, ask for feedback and you will see your audience not only grow but be more involved in what you do.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Before uploading your first show do a test show. See how long it takes you to do the show prep and production. Make sure you have both the technical and content aspects down. Have an idea where you’re going. Make a list for yourself of show topics for the first ten or fifteen shows to give yourself a head start. Do your show regularly. If it’s a weekly show do it weekly -- your audience will be looking for your next episode.

Don’t get discouraged if you’re not getting the kind of download numbers or audience feedback you think you should be getting. Have question about podcasting? Ask other podcasters. I have found the podcasting community to be very helpful. Be original!


Guess what? Macworld/iWorld 2012 is almost here and The Mac Attack will be there! Get to know Steve as well as all that his podcast has to offer by subscribing.

Not interested in Macworld? Check out iSee, iShoot, iPhone the coolest and most helpful podcast focused specifically on iPhone photography with tips, tricks and techniques for making those pictures FANTASTIC. Subscribe!

Have any questions or feedback, you can email Steve: tmasteve (at) gmail (dot) com.



Podcast Luminaries: A Window To The Magic

Are you up for some magic? A Window To The Magic one of the longest running Disneyland themed podcasts delivers just that. These guys have been pumping out content since 2005! They bring the sweet delight to the world of podcasting. If you are ever feeling a little blue, consider subscribing or downloading their iOS or Android app. It WILL bring a smile to your face!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

A WindowtotheMagic” is an unofficial fan-based Disneyland Audio Adventure Podcast presented in binaural audio that has been around since July 2005. The idea of the podcast is to take those who enjoy the magic of Disneyland into the Disney parks and resorts once a week, which is especially fun for those that cannot get to the park as often as we can. It is a unique podcast in the fact that it uses binaural audio to transport the listener into the Disney parks and resorts in such a way that they feel as if they are surrounded by the magic, and all of the sounds surround them when they are listening via headphones.

We have been Podcasting since July of 2005, continuously with very few breaks, on a mostly weekly schedule. We got into podcasting because we were starting up a website called WindowtotheMagic.com where we were going to be selling fan-created DVD’s that featured static “fishbowl” video of The Disneyland Resort with surround sound audio. When Podcasting came on the scene in early 2005, we heard Disneyland doing a podcast to celebrate its 50th anniversary and decided that we could do it differently and expand on their initial vision, making it something that was a little more personal and fun for the listener.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

As far as download numbers and audience engagement, the Disney brand has a huge following so you almost have a built-in audience when you do a Disney show, however being a unique show such as we are, a Disneyland audio adventure podcast, we aren’t sitting around talking about Disneyland or the latest Disney news, we are actually TAKING you there. Audience engagement is experienced through meeting people in the park who are fans of the show. Download numbers really don’t matter, even though we do enjoy a sizable following, we know that word gets around and people who love the show spread the word. It doesn’t really matter to us who listens as long as we are having fun and we are sharing the magic of the Disney parks with other people.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has created opportunities for us by allowing us to meet some of the people that create the magic of Disney, being able to attend media events at Disney and meet people that we otherwise would not meet. The podcast also has created the opportunity to create a friend base which with Disney Podcasting as a whole seems to be the most important factor overall. Most of the Disney podcasts that are out there have built listener bases that become friends. We even stated a group called the FriendsoftheMagic… that is what we call ourselves, as way of indicating that we are more that just podcasters and listeners but we are friends.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

The most memorable feedback that I have ever received came from a listener named Tracey. She indicated to me that my podcast had helped her though a very difficult time in her life, where she was depressed. She told me that she believes that my podcast may have, in fact, saved her life. Oddly enough, this is not something that is unique to Tracey, but every so often I will receive email from someone that claims that they came across our podcast when they were at the lowest portion of their lives and that through listening to us go and have magical adventures in the parks, they were able to remove themselves (if for even a short period of time) from the problems that they were experiencing, to have a little bit of fun and magic, and that was able to help them through and give them the strength to persevere.

What's your recording set-up plus workflow and what tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

When WTTM first started podcasting back in 2005 we used a stereo microphone and the iRiver recorder, very similar to that which Adam Curry used on his show, in fact that is where I heard about it. Since then we have upgraded through several recorders finally reaching the Zoom h1 digital audio recorder which gives us the ability to record up to 10 hours on a single battery. We also have increased our microphone quality and moved up to binaural in-ear microphones which help create the unique sound that WTTM presents to its listeners. The raw audio is imported into our Mac computers, edited using Final Cut Express, finally encoded using iTunes. WindowtotheMagic has used libsyn exclusively for hosting and distribution since our inception and we have NEVER considered otherwise.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

We find that social media gives WTTM the ability to share our day-to-day thoughts with our listeners as well as news and things regarding the Disney Theme parks in addition to events/meets happening with the podcast. We go out each week to the Disneyland Resort and host a meet up at the new Trader Sam’s Enchanted Tiki Bar in the Disneyland Hotel. We use Twitter and Facebook to get the word out that we are going to be there, what time we are going to be there, remind them that we are going to be there and to encourage them to come out and join us.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

WindowtotheMagic does have some very unique and even FAMOUS listeners, a fact that we enjoy very much. I was attending a special event one time at Disneyland, and I saw Neil Patrick Harris, who had graciously lent his voice to our Halloween episode a few years ago. I walked over to Neil, wanting to thank him for participating in our podcast. I said to him, “Hi, my name is Paul Barrie, I am from WTTM, and wanted to thank you for being part of our…” And he responded with, “Oh, yes…I know you are, Paul. I recognize your voice from WindowtotheMagic.”

Now folks you have not lived until Neil Patrick Harris has looked at you and said “I know how you are!” Absolute… Podcasting… Heaven.

What advise would you give a new podcaster!

First off, you have to podcast about the things that you love. If you podcast about things that you don’t like you are not going to do it: Secondly, look at what you want to podcast about, find a specific thing that you can give a unique perspective to and then build upon that. Also, look at how often how often you think you can do a podcast. If you think that you can do a podcast every week, every other week, once per month, whatever… If you decide if you can do a podcast once per week, then do one every TWO weeks, if you decide every month, then do one every TWO months. The reason for that is, you will never realize how much work is involved with podcasting until you get into it. So it is best to start small and if you find that you can move up and do them more often, great, but it is better to set a goal that you can definitely reach right from the beginning.

The Business of Podcasting

Now as far as business related topics… Podcasting has allowed WTTM the ability to generate revenue through having our listeners donate monthly to the show to keep it going, as well as to get information out regarding our fan created DVDs that we sell. These were the genesis of the podcast, so it is odd that the podcast is now the vehicle for getting the word out about the DVDs that were originally the thing that created the podcast in the first place. It’s like a giant circle.

When going from being a totally free podcast, to one that is requesting donations and/or charging a premium, WTTM did in fact, receive quite a reaction from its listeners in regards to moving over. MOST were excited by the idea of premium content, while some were not pleased, as can be expected. We have lost a small number of listeners because of this move… Our model is that we put out two shows per month that are free for all, and then, for those that support shows, they receive two additional shows. It is definitely something that you should keep in mind when starting your show, its probably a good idea to do the combination, I would not say charging for your podcast entirely is a good idea. I think you should provide free content and then for those that like what you are doing provide additional content.


Want a bit of the Magic right now? Check out this awesome Halloween episode as well as some recent Audio :) If you want to participate in the WTTM community you can send your feedback to 206-984-9886 or email podcast(at)windowtothemagic(dot)com

If you want to get one of the infamous DVDs that started it all get yourself over to the DVD Store! Let's keep the magic going!



Podcasting Luminaries: Cliff Ravenscraft aka The Podcast Answer Man

podcast answer man logo

Cliff Ravenscraft has been podcasting since December 16, 2005! Woah! And he has created soooo much content (nearly 3000 individual episodes) you could spend all of 2012 consuming it all. Whether you are interested in social media, tech, productivity and advise for businesses, The Hunger Games, balanced healthy living, or more, Cliff's got something at http://gspn.tv/shows that will engage you and at minimum inspire you to do something! In these past 6 years Cliff has become a powerful voice in the field of podcasting.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

When I launched my first podcast, it was just a hobby. I was simply wanting to play around with the technology of podcasting. I had been blogging for many years and feel in love with the idea of producing my own podcast as if I had my own radio show.

My first podcast was a fan podcast devoted to the television show lost (Link: http://LostPodcast.com). My wife joined me with episode 002 and she joked that we would be lucky if 50 people would be interested in listening to us share our thoughts on the show. However, due to the popularity of the television series, our audience grew to a size of tens of thousands.

There was a time when I became caught up in the mini fame of it all. I had become obsessed with stats, sometimes checking them more than once an hour throught the day. Over time, I came to realize that something bigger than building a "fan base" was happening with our show due to the emails we started to recieve.

While my wife and I are both Christians, we didn't do anything with our podcast to cover the show from a "faith angle." We were just simply fans of the show and purposely left our faith out of most of the conversation since we knew that 40% of our audience did not share our faith.

From time to time, LOST would bring an element of faith into their storyline. They had a supposed Catholic priest on the island, they titled an episode "The 23rd Psalm," quoted BIble references, and such. Because these were brought up, we did cover them a bit.

As I said, emails started to pour in from our listeners. Many of them would say things like, "I've been listening to your podcast for the past several weeks and I have this suspicion that you are and your wife might be Christians…" When I responded to these emails, I confirmed that were indeed. From those emails, lifelong relationships had been formed. I want to point out that not all of those who wrote were Christians themselves.

Due to the number of emails that began to come in, not related to the tv show, we launched two new podcasts. Our second show was the Pursuing A Balanced Life Podcast and our third show was the Encouraging Others Through Christ Podcast. We began to use these other podcasts to answer the questions that were coming in about faith, finances, parenting, money, etc.

Over time, I quit concerning myself about the fame, gave up on stats and realized just how important each single listener was. For me, the focus was no longer podcasting fun, fame, or profit.

I continued to produce podcast content because we noticed that it was making a positive difference in the lives of those who were listening to our show(s). More on this in the answer to the next question.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

I can honestly say that podcasting has CHANGED MY LIFE! After a year of podcasting, it got to the point where I had been spending approximately 10 to 15 hours each week producing content for several shows and I would spend hours each day answering emails from those in our online community.

I began to dream of doing podcasting full-time as my career in December of 2006, though I only saw this as pipe dream that would never really amount to anything more.

However, I became more and more drawn into the world of podcasting and building this online community around our content. As I occasionally shared my dream of podcasting full time in our show(s), people would write in and encourage me to quit my job and "go for it."

Eventually, enough people convinced my wife and I that it might be possible and in September of 2007, my wife and I announced to our community that I was going to put a 90 Day notice into "day job."

Here's the deal, I had spent 11 years building a rather successful career as an insurance agent selling auto, home, life, and health insurance in a family run insurance agency. I was next in line to take over the agency. However, I did put in that notice and on January 1st, 2008, I began my full-time career in podcasting.

You can hear my full story in this YouTube video of my BlogWorld NYC 2011 talk.

I do want to point out that by turning my passion for podcasting into my full-time career, there have been times where my focus had turned to "the money" aspect of it. However, On October 17th, 2011, I posted episode 230 of Podcast Answer Man titled "Why Do I Do What I Do?" I think it's one of the top ten of the nearly three thousand podcast episodes that I have produced.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Oh Wow! This is so difficult to answer. If you go to http://gspn.tv/plus that page contains a bunch of audio testimonials from our gspn.tv community about what our network means to them. We also have an entire wall in our studio devoted to the letters, cards, etc that people have sent us from all over the world.

There are two pieces of feedback that do stand out to me though.

First, it would be a dear friend of ours who, after getting to know her very well for over the past few years, just rencetly shared with us, in 2011, that the reason she is so thankful for the work that we do with our podcast content and our online community is due to the fact that our podcasts are what encouraged her to not follow through with a plan to take her own life.

I really don't want to provide any more details than this. But as you can imagine, this had a pretty profound impact on the way we view the importance of what we share in our podcasts.

Second was an envelope that we received in July 2011 from Stuart Crane, one of our relatively new gspn.tv listeners. Inside the envelope was a voluntary contribution of TWELVE THOUSAND DOLLARS and a letter that explained, just briefly, why he had sent the check. If you want to see that check and read that letter, you can at http://gspn.tv/YearOfProvidence

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

Podcasting is both directly and indirectly responsible for nearly 100% of our business income. If you are interested in reading about this in full detal, I encourage you to read the blog post that I did at http://PodcastAnswerMan.com/income.

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

My entire BlogWorld LA 2011 talk was devoted fully to this question. The title of my talk was "Forget CPM, Proven Methods of Generating Serious Income From Your Podcasting Efforts. Here is the embed of that talk below.


Interested in refining your podcast or as Cliff would say "taking it to the next level" check out this free podcasting video tutorial as well as his premium online podcasting training course. You can also consume hundreds of hours of podcasting tips by checking out Podcast Answer Man.

You can send feedback to Cliff at Cliff (at) PodcastAnswerMan (dot) com, 859-795-4067 or follow him @gspn.


Podcast Luminaries: Fastpitch Softball TV with Gary Leland

Gary Leland is no stranger to the world of podcasting and is a great example of longevity, consistency and achievement. If you ever want to delve into the world of fastpitch softball, The Fastball Softball TV is your first stop! Subscribe!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Fun & Profit. I have been involved with Fastpitch Softball for a long time. I have coached two Texas State Championship teams. I own a Fastpitch Softball Sporting good store, and website http://SoftballJunk.com. I am also the Texas State Director for USSSA Fastpitch http://USSSAntx.com, so podcasting about fastpitch softball was a great fit for my fastpitch softball enterprises.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

The world of fastpitch softball is a very small world anytime I go to a tournament, or convention for fastpitch softball, fans of the show tell me how much they enjoy the show. That is always a nice thing to hear.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

Since I started with an audio podcast, and now I am mostly video I would have to say cameras, green screen, and video editing software.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

I have heard from or met almost every Olympian that ever played softball because of my podcasts.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Yes, but I think that is because I work at it. I do not think just adding your self to Facebook, or Google + means results unless you work at it.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

I film the main body of my shows at ether softball camps or softball clinics. Then I come back to the studio and record my intro and outro for each episode. The into really just explains what each episode is about.

Then I import everything into final cut on my iMac, and edit it there.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

I now know most D1 softball coach, and I said earlier most former Olympians that played softball, as well as many Pro Softball Players. These relationships are opening new opportunities all the time. I am now the Texas State USSSA Director, due to relationships I built from podcasting.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

I sell advertising on my episodes which brings in money, but advertising my own softball store http://SoftballJunk.com bring in most of my podcasting revenue.

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you see podcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

I was in business already. I added podcasting to enhance my existing business.

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

Do not get discouraged. Most people do not find advertisers overnight. It could take years.


If you want to contact Gary or Fastpitch Softball you can do so by emailing gary (at) fastpitch.tv or call his feedback line 209-Softbal. Follow Fastpitch on Twitter or Facebook.

Listen to the show for a coupon for $30 off softball bats 5 minutes into the show.


More from our PODCAST LUMINARIES SERIES:

Polymer Clay, Dan Carlin, GamerTag Radio, Genealogy Gems Podcast, Never Not Funny, Steve Runner, Keith and the Girl


Podcast Luminaries: Duct Tape Marketing

John Jantsch and Duct Tape Marketing = massive success. As podcasters subscribing and listening to all 300+ episodes which begun in 2005, will do wonders for your brand :)


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Honestly I started the show because I had done an AM radio show for about a year and saw how much access it gave me to the thought leaders in my industry - turns out it's now produced fun, fame and profit

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

I kid you not I started recording phone coversations on a speaker phone with a mic capturing me and the guest - I don't do that anymore. Now I use a mixer condenser mic and software to edit each track individually.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has opened so many doors because of the people that I've had on the show and then become friends with. People like Guy Kawasaki, Seth Godin, Harvey MacKay, David Allen - have all endorsed my book and created opportunities for me because we met while I recorded twenty minutes or so of our conversation.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

For me it's a big piece, we've had significant revenue sponsorships for the podcast, but more than that it's a tool to integrate into my overall content and education puzzle. I write books and products, speak and consult and my blog and podcast are the proving ground for a lot of my ideas and a great deal of my exposure to the folks that end up buying our products and sharing our brand.


Want to learn more about Duct Tape Marketing? Go to www.ducttapemarketing.com for a wealth of information and products. You can also follow Duct Tape Marketing on Twitter and Facebook.


More from our PODCAST LUMINARIES SERIES:

Polymer Clay, Dan Carlin, GamerTag Radio, Genealogy Gems Podcast, Never Not Funny, Steve Runner, Keith and the Girl


Podcast Luminaries: Grammar Girl

If you have ever wanted to refine your grammar, or simply expand your knowledge Grammar Girl is the one for the job. Mignon Fogarty has been podcasting since 2006 and has had some tremendous success via the podcasting world. Subscribe to her show to listen to a high quality podcast, succinct, clear and to the point, while being full of personality.


What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

A long time ago, I got an e-mail from a military guy who was talking about Grammar Girl with his buddies in a late-night diner when they were overheard by "a bunch of gay thespians" (his words) who were also Grammar Girl fans. He said the two groups, which never would have interacted under normal circumstances, talked and laughed for quite a while about how much they all loved the Grammar Girl podcast.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

Penn Jillette is a fan and invited me to the Penn & Teller show in Las Vegas to listen and let him know if he was making any grammar mistakes. I was so entranced by the show, that I forgot all about the grammar and had to attend a second time so I could give him feedback! There weren't any errors, although we had an interesting conversation about "disappear" as a transitive verb, as in "I will disappear this woman." I had never heard it used that way, but it turns out to be a legitimate use.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

I've built big followings on Twitter and Facebook, and it started with the podcast, but they have taken on a life of their own, and now many of those followers aren't podcast listeners. I actually have to remind myself every once in a while to mention the podcast and encourage people to subscribe. I just dabble on YouTube and Google+ right now.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has changed my life. Because of the podcast I was invited to be on the Oprah Winfrey Show to talk about grammar, I got a major publishing deal with Macmillan, and my first book was a New York Times best-seller (which I'm convinced is because of the enthusiasm of my podcast fans). I'm Grammar Girl full time, and although podcasting is only part of my income now, it's the thing that made it all possible.


Mignon now has 6 books under her belt with her newest one coming up in November "101 Words To Sound Smart." You can learn all about them HERE.

If you want to keep up with Mignon you can follow her on Twitter or Facebook!


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Polymer Clay, Dan Carlin, GamerTag Radio, Genealogy Gems Podcast, Never Not Funny, Steve Runner, Keith and The Girl


Podcast Luminaries: Keith and The Girl

SERIOUSLY? You haven't listened to Keith and the Girl??? What in the world are you waiting for. Subscribe. They've been at it since March 2005. With Keith and Chemda you are guaranteed to laugh, cringe, question, scream and any other emotion known to man. You certainly won't be bored. And by golly, you won't be bored with this interview ;)


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

We started Keith and The Girl to promote, in some way, stand-up comedy/writing and singing that we were doing on the side. We soon got into it so much so that we wanted it to be the main thing we were pursuing. That soon meant it had to be our only job as we were dedicating so much time to it. The money was necessary. Merchandise here, an ad there... So... put us down for fun, fame and money. We're in for all three.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Unfortunately the negative email. We're artists in the end, and of course artists focus more on the negative. I seem to start reading the emails that begin with: "Hey, dipshits!" Ones I actually enjoy? We really like hearing we helped/changed a person's life - made them more confident, what have you. The people that get tattoos of our logo because of how we affected them never gets old. www.KATG.com/tattoos

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

Bigger and better equipment that we don't really understand. Do you know what a compressor does? I don't. We have one though. I think it's working.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

Your mother. (I'm just kidding. I don't know if she listens or not. I do know that she's a whore though. (I'm sorry again. All our listeners are notable is the thing. (Except for the ones that start their emails with 'Hey, dipshits!')))

Favorite libsyn.com feature?

The ease of putting up shows. Without question. I don't know how to make an RSS feed. I think one of the esses stands for Simple? Please. Nothing simple about all these 1s and 0s. LibSyn takes care of it all though. I guess they have a 2 keeping an eye on everything.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Hmm... It must be, right? I'm gonna say yes.

What is your workflow: include hardware, software, text editing, and services as necessary

I met someone at my high school reunion. They said, "Must be nice to have a show and only work one hour a day..." I didn't correct them. I said, "It's great, you should try it." They said, "I so should. Must be nice..." They never will.

It's a job, and it's work, and we work it about 12 hours a day. The workflow is serious, and that's why it ends up so rewarding.

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Those are my choices? I guess the right answer is engagement, right?

Of course download numbers matter. That's the whole point. But I'm going to say 'audience engagement'. That really seems like the right one to pick.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Don't, actually. We were here first!


If you can't get enough of Keith and the Girl you can:


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Podcasting Luminaries: Skepticality


Perhaps one of the coolest and nicest couple of podcasters around, Derek and Swoopy have been producing Skepticality since May 2005! The show is bound to have you engaged with their lovely snarky angle ;) Expect interviews with scientists and debunking myths, popular thinking, and pseudoscience. What are you waiting for? SUBSCRIBE!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

We started the show because when we started no one was addressing the Skeptical outlook, at all, in podcasting. Of course this has all changed since. There are now over 100 or more podcasts which specifically focus on skeptical issues.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

The coolest thing is some of the folks who have contacted us who have been listening to the show since the beginning. The best example is Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the current host of the PBS show NOVA ScienceNOW and the current director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, he sent us an e-mail quite soon after iTunes included podcasting. Either him, or Adam Savage, one of the Mythbusters.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach?

Most definately. We have a presence on most social networks to keep, and potentially new listeners informed about new events which we are involved with, or items of interest which folks who enjoy our content might want to know about.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

The best example of how our podcasting has created opportunity for us would have to be when we were asked to become the Official Podcast of Skeptic Magazine. That honor has been a great partnership and gives us some very cool opportunities to out and be more engaged with the public.


Derek and Swoopy are directors for DragonCon, worlds largest culture convention, and run the full Skeptic Track there! http://www.skeptrack.org/ Make sure you come see them next Labor Day!*

If you want to contact Skepticality you can do so via their email: host (at) skepticality (dot) com, or their feedback line: 1-866-800-212. You can also follow them on twitter @skepticality or their Facebook Page.

A fabulous way to consume their content and support the show is to get their awesome iPhone or Android App!


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Podcasting Luminaries: Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny has been going strong since 2006! That's 5 1/2 years, an impressive length of time for podcasting. Jimmy Pardo, his producer Matt Belknap plus fantastic guests will have you engaged, entertained and laughing. Who's not up for that? Subscribe to the podcast HERE.


What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Early on (like in the first year of the show) we heard from a woman who was in the Peace Corps stationed in the Republic of Georgia. It took her something like 19 hours to download one episode of our show because the Internet connection was so bad there, but she would do it just to have something to listen to on long bus rides through the country.

Then, just recently, we were doing a live show in Denver and this woman came up and introduced herself to us -- it was the Peace Corps lady! She thanked us again for the hours entertainment and gave us gifts from her time abroad.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

We started in Jimmy's dining room with a $50 mixer, microphones that were 3 for $20 and my wife's old iBook. Now we have our own studio with much nicer equipment. The biggest change, though, is that we now do a four camera shoot that our video producer Eliot live-edits, so people can choose to either listen to or watch the show.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

It was pretty crazy to learn that [Jon Hamm][] listened to us in his trailer on the set of Mad Men. We've since had him on the show a bunch of times -- including our first all-night livestream charity event Pardcast-a-thon 2009 -- and he turns out to be as funny as he is handsome! (I guess people know that about him by now, what with his work on 30 Rock and SNL.)

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

Find a format that suits your talents and your schedule, so that you can be consistently good over the weeks, months and years.

The first part of that is obvious -- you want to put your best foot forward, but the second part is just as critical: if your show is labor-intensive to produce, it will be difficult to put it out regularly, and that will make it hard to grow and reach people.


Want a gateway episode for the "unititiated"? Check out Episode 811f: Conan O'Brien (fantastic episode).

There is also a full 100 minute episode with actor Ty Burrell (Modern Family). Check out Episode 914f!

If you'd like some Primo content go on to their website. Have questions for them? Here is their audience feedback email: pardcast (at) gmail (dot) com.


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Podcasting Luminaries: The Genealogy Gems Podcast

Lisa Louise Cooke has taken her passion into profit. Having been podcasting for 4 1/2 years with the Genealogy Gems Podcast she has created a thriving engaged community and has become an expert within the genealogy world, even producing and hosting a podcast for the #1 Genealogy Magazine in the US, *The Family Tree Magazine. Do you want riveting content? Try subscribing to Genealogy Gems Podcast!*


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I’ve always been passionate about family history, and I love to teach others how to climb their own family tree, so when I published my first episode I was just excited at the prospect of being able to reach and help more people.

But why we start podcasting isn’t always what helps us keep going because it’s a lot of hard work. That’s where the fun and profit comes in. Creating each episode is a fulfilling creative endeavor. I get in the zone and can’t wait to see how it will turn out. And not being able to pay bills will bring a podcast to it’s knees faster than anything. I’m very fortunate that my podcast has evolved into a profitable career.

What is your most memorable feedback from a listener?

Seeing listeners email pop into my inbox is always a thrill. Over the years I’ve received hundreds of messages, so it’s very hard to say which is the most memorable. Folks write me to tell me how listening to the podcast has led them to a long lost ancestor or a parent they’ve never met before. Here are just some that come to mind:

“All right, you've now done two consecutive podcasts that had me crying while listening and vowing that I had to drop you a note just to say thanks…And then you did it again in Episode 39. Your story of reconciling with your Dad after so many years, and finding the family treasures. Again, you had me so capitvated, with tears rolling down my face as I listened. “ Sean in Minnesota

“You have a fantastic podcast! You keep a "smile" in your voice throughout the podcast. Wonderfully refreshing…We have been spending a lot of time together lately Lisa Louise. You have been going with me on walks with my dog, on drives into the town and even talking me to sleep at night! Finally I went to your GGPodcast.tv site today to subscribe to your newsletter. Its like I can't get enough of what you have to teach.” Simona in Scotland.

“When I listen to the podcast, it's like inviting a friend into my home for a visit. I'm a Premium member as well!!” Debra, USA.

Any notable names of listeners you have heard from over the years?

I’m not sure who’s out there listening but I’ve been fortunate to have several notables on the show: Lisa Kudrow (Friends), Vanessa Williams (Soul Food), Rose O’Donnell, The Lennon Sisters, the band Venice, Director Ali Selim (Sweet Land), and Tim Russell (A Prairie Home Companion) in addition to many “stars” of the genealogy world.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

To prevent “podfading” you have several things to consider before you ever switch on your microphone:

Do you have the time? Your audience will expect consistency. You can’t expect them to be loyal if you’re not. When I first started, each episode took me a week to create a 30 minute episode. And 80% of that time was preparing and writing – NOT recording! Better to do 10 minute episodes and be consistent than 45 minute episodes and be MIA. The good news is that if you put a great process in place you can dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes to create an episode.

What is your goal? What do you want your listeners to get from you show? Do you want to be known as an expert in your niche? Do you want / need to make money? Thinking these questions through and having a game plan will keep you focused and encouraged. I post reminders on my desktop about why I’m doing what I’m doing so that when times get tough and I feel like giving up I can quickly remind myself why I should keep going.

How important is podcasting to the success of other revenue generating opportunities you currently have?

My podcast is critical to my relationship with my audience. Thankfully it’s an intimate medium because they hear your voice (rather than just reading.) It’s how I keep them informed about my latest offerings. It also provides an avenue for me to connect with other movers and shakers in my field through interviews. I spend time getting to know them, promoting them and staying connected.

It’s all about relationships – pay attention to your relationships and you’ll be in good shape.

Podcasting by itself really isn’t a money maker for most people. You need products that your loyal listeners can purchase. I take a very diversified approach, and I have many income streams that branch out from my podcast. In the fast moving age of technology I think this is best approach.

Did you start off podcasting and that lead into a business or did you see podcasting as a necessary support for an existing business?

I started podcasting first. I went into it with the faith that if I followed my instincts and worked hard it would become clear to me what to do next. And it did. I can look back and see how everything up until I began podcasting laid the foundation for this amazing career built around my passion for family history.

Podcasting has led to establishing myself as an international conference speaker, author and publisher, writer for a national magazine, online instructor and much more! My business has grown by leaps and bounds, and my podcasts are central to that. I start each day with gratitude and give it everything I’ve got!

What piece of advice would give others looking to generate revenue from podcasting whether directly or indirectly?

  • Work WAY more than 40 hours a week
  • Write a book and promote it on your show
  • Diversify: Establish multiple income streams
  • Provide fantastic content
  • Provide customer service that exceeds expectations
  • Be patient – full time income doesn’t come overnight – but for me it did come.
  • Put your family first: they will be there much longer than your podcast or your business!

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react

when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

I launched Genealogy Gems Premium Membership within a year of starting the podcast. I am committed to providing lots of great free content, but there are fans who want more and I saw membership as an ideal way to deliver it. And because I love podcasting it was critical to my long term success that I have a product in place that could pay the bills and not hugely cut in to my time. Membership is ideal for that because when I produce a premium show or video it can service 100 or 10,000 members.

How your audience reacts is very much in your control. It’s all about how you position it. I let my audience know that I am committed to providing the free podcasts. But I also told them that if they love the free show, they’re going to love being a member. And then I made sure there was top notch content for them to love! My listeners were thrilled and joined right in. They are awesome!!


How to join the Genealogy Gems Podcast Community:

Check out Lisa's newest book, "The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, 2011" available at at the store on her website.


Wanna podcast? Join the libsyn team, here's your first step. Want your own App for your show? Get started here

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Podcasting Luminaries: ESL Pod

Podcasting since July 2005, ESL Pod has been providing accessible quality education to those that perhaps do not have access to learning English as a second language. Both Dr. Jeff McQuillan and Dr. Lucy Tse are highly qualified professors with over 30 years of experience. If you are looking to refine your English or perhaps know someone looking to learn English as a second language have them Subscribe to ESL Pod!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Well, two of the three! I started the podcast as a way of getting around traditional publishing gatekeepers in my field, education. Both I and my colleague, Lucy Tse, had worked for more than 10 years in academia as professors of applied linguistics and education, and later as a publishing consultants and editors.

After having read about podcasting in the New York Times in early 2005, I realized that this was a way of reaching the "end user" - for me, the learner - directly, without having to get the approval of a publishing house or even another teacher. So we started English as a Second Language Podcast to help adults improve their acquisition of English.

For the first 8-10 months, it was purely for fun. Then we became one of the top-ranked podcasts in several countries, and decided that if we were to do this right, we needed to make money off the podcast so we could devote the time necessary. So in May, 2006, we launched a "premium" service for $10 a month that entitles members to an 8-10 page Learning Guide for each of our three weekly episodes or lessons.

As for fame, that was never really an issue. We've preferred to fly under the radar for the most part, relying on word of mouth publicity and the occasional boost from iTunes featuring us on their podcast home page. We've never run ads or done press releases or tried to promote ourselves with the mainstream media (who, for the most part, have ignored us, in all languages!). That might change soon as we begin to branch out into other markets, but its worked just fine for us so far.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

It is hard to answer this question without sounding trite, but sometimes the hackneyed answer is the right one: You've got to love what you do and know what you love. Both elements - loving and knowing - are important. You have to love what you do because that enthusiasm will come through to your listeners, who will be infected by it and want to continue listening to you.

I honestly love sitting in front of my microphone and teaching via the podcast. It's like I'm having this one-on-one conversation simultaneously with tens of thousands of students, and I don't even have to take roll!

Part of loving what you do is loving your listeners, in the sense of caring about them. When you care about someone, you're honest with them, you are sincere. Insincerity and lack of enthusiasm are immediately detectable by your audience.

Living in Los Angeles, I get to hear the greatest sports broadcaster that's ever lived, Vin Scully, call the Dodger baseball games each summer. Vin comes across as this completely honest, sincere guy who cares about his listeners. I won't ever be a tenth as good as Scully, but that's my goal, my target. When people trust you, they'll listen to you.

You also have to know what you love. You can fool people for a while, I suppose, but eventually if you don't have the chops to do what you're doing, the knowledge to back up what you say, that will become apparent to your listeners.

If I'm going to spend my time listening to you for 15 or 30 minutes, you better know what you're talking about, because there are 500,000 other podcasts out there I can switch to in a heartbeat.

In my field, language teaching, there are thousands of people who teach languages without really knowing what they're doing, both on the Internet and in the traditional classroom. When you think about it, language teaching has probably been one of the most spectacular failures of our educational system. There are some complex historical reasons for that, both in the U.S. and in other countries, but core problem is that teachers and would-be teachers aren't familiar with the basic principles of language acquisition.

One of the goals of our podcast is to bring the findings of the past 30 years of second language acquisition research and apply them in a way that helps people improve their proficiency.

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

When we launched the premium service in 2006, we kept all of the audio files for free, charging only for the supplemental PDF Learning Guides, so we didn't take anything away from the free service. We just added something to it. I think that helped ease the transition.

Our audio files are still free - we've just released our 1000th episode! We never got any complaints (or very few), and instead get emails every day thanking us for the free lessons we offer. This has worked for us so far, even though only a small fraction of our listeners actually join up as paying members.

As in direct market advertising, which I had done for a previous business venture, you rely on a percentage of people - and I mean a very small percentage of people - to buy what you're selling.

We don't ever release numbers on paid subscribers, but the approach is really very simple. Your podcast is your "flyer" which you send out to X number of people at a cost of Y. Taking a certain response rate (say, 1%), you multiply that by the price of your service per user to get your potential revenue, then subtract your costs.

For us, when that figure exceeded what we were making in our other business ventures, we dropped the latter and devoted ourselves full-time to producing the podcast. Our costs have gone up slightly since the early days, with contractors who handle post-production, editing, the website, and customer service, but for the most part we've kept costs to a minimum, and do 90% of the work ourselves.

It helped that I had started business before this one, so I knew that keeping costs down can make the difference between a profitable business and a failing one. I don't even have a decent business card! We all work from home offices, and I still use the same $150 dollars of equipment to record that I had in '06 (a Shure SM-58 and a Eurorack UB802 mixer).

Everything I needed to learn on the technical side I learned from Rob Walch's Podcast411 website back in the day (thanks, Rob!) and a few pieces of advice here and there at the early podcast conventions.

I should mention that we tried to do some advertising in the early stages but that was never enough to support ourselves full-time, and I don't think it ever would be. We have a very unique market: People who don't speak or understand very well the language we are using in the podcast!

In addition, our listeners are spread out across more than 200 countries and a dozen different demographic profiles, from high school students to businesswomen to retirees. It's not an easy market to advertise to. I think almost all of the language learning podcasts that imitated our format in the years after our launch followed this same business model of a "freemium" service.


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Podcasting Luminaries: Danny Pena (Gamertag Radio)

Danny Pena and Gamertag Radio have been rockin' the podcasting world since 2005. During these past 6 years GTR has been featured by high profile main stream media and has steadily built a devoted following. GTR continues to innovate with their Podcast App which features exclusive content as well as their fan product launch parties. Subscribe!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

I started online radio back in 2001 and podcasting with my show, "Gamertag Radio," in 2005. I love it. We're still doing this is because of the fans. They are the reason we continue with the show. Also, I don't see anything wrong with making some money with something you love to do. This is how we pay the bills, travel for more content, buy better equipment for the show and create community parties for our fans.

What has changed the most in your recording setup since you started?

If you listen to our first show, the sound quality was horrible. For my birthday, my girlfriend surprised me with my first podcasting studio. Better mics and mixer. I also have a Microtrack made by M-Audio for interviews and event coverage, like E3 in Los Angeles.

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

One of my favorites is having an app for smartphones thanks to libsyn. This is a great way for fans to download the show while they are away from home or if they want to get extra content via the app.

During E3 we uploaded more than 60 videos just for our mobile app users, and sometimes we do special giveaways just for them.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach? (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+, etc)

Social media is a great "keep in touch" tool. It's helped us stay in touch with our fans more than anything. It creates a special emotional connection with fans. That's very important for podcasters: to always try your best to stay in touch with your fans. No matter what.

We get more new fans to our website via search engines than social media, but one thing I have to say that I like about social media is that fans are always spreading the word to their friends about the show through their different social media platforms.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Because of our podcast, we've been featured on TV (MTV True Life, In The Qube), newspapers, magazines and major websites (Wall Street Journal, CNN, Engadget, IGN, etc). We've also had the opportunities to throw product launch parties for gaming companies.

Just a few years ago, MTV contacted us to join their new ad network, called "MTV Tribes," and libsyn has also helped us in the past with advertisment. All this happened because of our hard work in not only our podcast, but on our website too. Having a team that's always willing to take the show to a whole new level is always a big plus too.

For those new podcasters out there: Don't worry about numbers. Podcasting is all about people with passion. Without passion, your podcast is dead. Stay working and try your best to network with other podcasters. Opportunities will come.


You want to see some awesome videos of the GTR Fan and Launch parties, check out: HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE

Wanna dive into GamerTag Radio? Audience Feedback 786-273-7GTR or godfree (at) gamertagradio (dot) com.


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Podcasting Luminaries: Dan Carlin

Podcasting since 2005, Dan Carlin has built a steady, strong and powerful body of work, as well as an engaged following. Make sure you check out and subscribe to Hardcore History and Common Sense with Dan Carlin...if you don't, you are seriously missing out.


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you doing the show?

Well, this is my work. I was a radio personality before technology eliminated the requirement that I be employed by someone who owned a broadcast transmitter in order to be heard by a wide audience.

I don't need a radio station to reach listeners anymore. This is like a dream come true for me. Work from home...no consultants...no creative constraints...complete control over all elements of the operation.

And the technology matured just as the radio business was becoming truly unbearable. It seemed like the most natural transition in the world to move from the brick-and-mortar version of broadcasting to the Internet one.

I think I do the podcast(s) for all the reasons you suggested (and more). Add to your list the opportunity to create and be creative. A podcast is an enormous blank canvas. There is so much room for invention and creative latitude. It's one of the best things about podcasts that they are NOT part of the homogenized Old Media culture that operates along a narrow spectrum of creativity, and panders to the lowest common denominator.

In podcasting, virtually anything goes...niche audiences can be targeted...and there are no focus groups to water down your ideas. All sorts of artistic gambles and experiments become possible.

One of the things I love about podcasting (it probably falls under the "fame" motivation!) is the permanence of the work you do. In radio if you did a good show (or a bad one) it was gone into the ether right after you were done. These podcasts, however, are akin to creating something carved in "digital stone".

This work we do will outlive us (in some dark, dusty corner of cyberspace).

I have often said that podcast episodes are a lot more like record albums or music CDs than radio or television broadcasts. It isn't about how many listeners your podcast/show has right NOW, it's about how many people will actually hear or see any given piece of work you produce before the Earth is swallowed up by the Sun (or our civilization goes dark...whichever comes first). I have often thought, "I wonder how many people will eventually be exposed to this episode?".

It's marvelously satisfying to think that people as yet unborn may hear our work (long after we are gone). Why not though? The books of authors from another age are still read and the music of long dead musicians continues to be played (and heard, and PAID FOR!).

The Roman orator Cicero said that "writing is the only true form of immortality". I think you could add podcasting as well. Remembering this fact helps us to keep focused on quality when we are putting the shows together. After all...crappy episodes are forever too.

What tools on libsyn have you found most helpful in building your brand/podcast?

Anything that helps us to know more about the audience is extremely valuable. Libsyn has been continually upgrading their capability in this regard since we first began our relationship with them.

We have been podcasting since June 2005 and we have been on libsyn since Summer 2006. Until we began using libsyn we really had no clear idea of how many people were even listening. Now we can break down trends in listenership, track progress using graphs, see how popular we are (or are not) in all the nations around the world.

This information does two things. It gives us concrete information that we can use to show other entities (such as advertisers) how many people are listening. It also becomes the tool we use to measure the effectiveness of anything else we do to increase listeners. Did that recent series of promotions we did increase the audience size? We go to libsyn to find out.

How has or has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

There's no downside to having lots of people exposed to your work (as long as you are pleased with it).

I think of how hard it was for anyone to try to get any sort of exposure for their art/work/talent/ideas 20 years ago and it was nigh impossible. Back then a person couldn't even show an audience what they had to offer unless they got some sort of "big break" that usually required all sorts of luck (and perhaps a ton of artistic compromises). But when you upload a podcast episode you never know who might hear it.

As a certain semi-mythical figure that I work with once said: "It's not always how MANY people are listening, but who those people listening ARE."

A podcast is like an advertisement for the creativity, skills and talent of the people doing it. Imagine that a young Eddie Murphy, George Carlin or Lenny Bruce came around today. They would all be huge podcasting talents because their work would stand on its own and people would share it virally.

They could do what they did without interference from those worried about ratings or language or advertiser sentiment. Once people heard/saw their work and once the audience reaction was clear other opportunities would follow.

Podcasting is the best career move I've ever made. More people have been exposed to what I do than ever were in either my television or my radio days. And that exposure has been international in scope.

Do you know how much money someone would have paid for exposure like this two decades ago?

Do you know how much the bandwidth would be costing us right now if operations like libsyn didn't exist?


Wanna check out Dan talking about "podcasting" as an artform? Watch this video. In addition to Dan's incredible amount of new content, he's got a catalog of history podcasts. Here is a direct link to one of Dan's history episodes, #33 "Old School Toughness."

Dan Carlin also has a pretty engaged audience, check out the awesome online forum!


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Podcasting Luminaries: Polymer Clay

Ilysa and Kira have been podcasting for over 4 years, and in that amount of time have created an incredible community and business all flowering from their awesome podcast Polymer Clay. Make sure you SUBSCRIBE!


Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach?

Social media has made a huge impact on our business, up until this past year or so we hadn't even spent $100 on advertising and most of our customers have come from our online efforts.

We found that YouTube brings many customers our way, its been a great marketing tool for us, it has helped to let people around the world know what we are doing and what is upcoming on our shows. We also love to share on Facebook and Twitter and get customers from there as well.

How has podcasting helped create opportunities for you?

Podcasting has given us a name in our niche market, we have been able to attend trade shows, retreats and other events as press, we have received products from companies which has given us topics for the show and a way to share them with our audience who might not have ever known they exist and who are unable to attend the events we cover.

We are getting ready to launch a new show called Things Crafty next month and will be expanding to all crafts so we expect even more opportunities to come our way.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

You have to love what you do or your show will not work, people respond to your passion and can tell if you are just in it for the money.

Do things on your show that are fun to you and your audience will respond. If its not fun then there is a better chance you won't want to continue and will end up podfading.

We are always thinking of ways to move forward, if we see a product or book we like we contact the company about reviewing it on the show, this helps to make it fun. We love trying to new things!

Has podcasting helped you grow your business.

Our shows Polymer Clay Podcast & Polymer Clay TV have been instrumental in growing our business.

The shows are what bring people to our website to see more of what we have to offer. They bring us the most exposure and also have helped people in our industry to view us as "experts" in our field, which creates trust.

If people don't trust you they will never buy from you, the show helps to bring trust and show our audience that we are real people with the same issues that they have.

If you charge for access to your podcasts or premium, how did your audience react when you started doing this? How did you handle this?

Our podcasts are free but we also have premium content. We now produce instructional DVD's and have premium paid downloadable videos and subscriptions.

We have found that if they like what you are doing on your show then they want to learn more and will pay to learn how to complete projects or techniques.

We will never charge for our podcasts, they are too valuable of a marketing tool for us and don't cost much to produce and the payoff is worth the effort.


If you want to be a part of the Polymer Clay community you can subscribe to the podcast, email them polymerclaypodcast (at) yahoo (dot) com or leave them some voice mail feedback (386) 935-2058.

Remember these ladies are launching a whole new show called Things Crafty where they will share their passion for all crafts, have contributing artists for a number of craft categories and will be having free live online video events, more downloadable media and DVDs.

The ladies also have a new DVD called Kaleidoscope Caning Ilysa's Way


Wanna podcast? Join the libsyn team, here's your first step.


Featuring Podcasting Luminaries: Phedippidations with Steve Runner


Steve Runner from Pheddipidations (“Fed-hip-id-ay-shuns”) has been podcasting since July 4, 2005. A true and steady podcasting pioneer, steady, inspiring, determined and an all around lovely man. Check out what's kept him going and as always SUBSCRIBE!


Fun, Fame or Profit? Why are you podcasting?

I produce Phedippidations both for fun and because I feel that that podcasting can make the world a better place.

I first laced up my shoes in the winter of 1998, and after finishing my first marathon in the Autumn of 1999, I came to believe that the act of running is one of the ways that human beings can achieve and maintain both health and happiness.

I started out as a Blogger, writing essays and articles on the topic of running under the title “Phedippidations”. This a title I created to pay homage to “Pheidippides” the Athenian herald who legend says ran the from the fields of Marathon to Athens, Greece with news that the outnumbered Athenian army had conquered the Persians.

“PHEDIPPIDations” is a series of conversATIONS about running, living your life to the top of your game. It’s about contemplating the philosophical questions that the ancient Greek Philosophers first posed, as it relates to the sport.

Have you found that social media has expanded your listener base/reach?

Social media has not helped to increase my audience very much, if at all. The libsyn statistics are incredibly accurate, and show no correlation between the number of my social media followers and those who download (and listen) to Phedippidations.

I have significantly more runners subscribed to my podcast than those who follow me on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

I feel that social media has its place in helping me to engage with my audience. I use Twitter, Facebook and other services to get immediate feedback from my listeners and to update them on what I’m doing with the show. As my audience is mostly comprised of runners, we share our daily running experiences with each other as a way to inspire and motivate each other to get our miles in!

What Is Your Workflow?

I almost always get my ideas for show topics while I’m out on a “long run” (when I have plenty of time to think). Typically I’ll begin research for an episode, and creating a script outline roughly eight weeks prior to publication.

I generally produce several different episode formats, for example:

  • My running of a road race, such as a marathon (Every year, for example, I record my own running of the Boston Marathon, and produce an episode with the sounds of my 26.2 mile run from Hopkinton Massachusetts all the way to downtown Boston).

  • A narrative presentation of a “Running Legend” in our sport.

  • Special shows such as episodes 55, 111, 147, 198 and 242 recorded from the Allagash Wilderness in the northern Maine Woods), and episodes dedicated to the “Word Wide Festival of Races” (a global virtual run that I’ve helped to organize annually for the past six years), as well as running meet-ups (which we call “Mojo Loco” events) where fellow runners get together to go for a run, in person!

I still use my old “iRiver 800 series” MP3 player/recorder for the “running” sequence of each episode: where I walk out of my squeaky front door and begin the days “long run”. I use a “Giant Squid” lapel microphone with a small lapel “wind sock” from Radio Shack for this segment.

For narration, I typically record in my studio (two ElectroVoice RE-20 microphones going into a Comp16 PreSonus compressor which feeds into a Eurorack UB1240FX-Pro 8 channel mixer). I feed an analog signal to my H2 Handy Recorder (which I also use for on-location recording) and take the MP3 output files for editing on my Windows based laptop.

When I have all of the raw tracks recorded, I edit them using Audacity. I save the completed audio file in .WAV format and use either The Conversations Networks “Levelator” or iTunes to even out the audio levels.

I edit the MP3 tags using Florian Heidenreich’s MP3Tag application and post to libsyn typically a week in advance (which gives me time to record some video bonus content for those who purchase my “Virtual Running Partner” iPhone and Android App).

Do download numbers matter matter to you? or is audience engagement key?

Not really; although as the number of listeners to Phedippidations has increased I have made more of an effort to improve the quality of my podcast.

A friend (and mentor) by the name of Christopher Penn recently taught me that having a larger, ever-increasing audience is a serious responsibility that I must not take for granted. Listeners to Phedippidations dedicate an hour of their time to listening to me run and talk with them, and I owe them something back.

For me, audience engagement is far more important than the number of fellow (and new) runners who listen to Phedippidations. I produce the show as a way of inspiring and motivating others to run by having a conversation and asking them to contemplate why this lifestyle is important. I want to help to create and celebrate a real (not virtual) running community.

Anyone who is listening to Phedippidations is going for a run with me, and as I’m the only one who has the microphone during our time together: I have an obligation to entertain, educate and (at the very least) keep my fellow runners company while we’re out on the road.

I can see that the number of listeners to Phedippidations is increasing, but it’s the engagement with my audience (and encouraging them to engage with each other) that motivates me to go out for a run with them and record a new episode.

What advise would you give a new podcaster so that they keep going!

I agree with all of the usual advice that veteran podcasters give to new podcasters (be consistent, keep the duration short, discard your first few attempts until your satisfied with the quality of your show, etc.) but I would add a few other bits of advice to help encourage new podcasters to keep going:

Podcast Your True Passion

It’s not enough to get behind a microphone (or camera) and speak about things that interest you, or that you enjoy talking about. You have to speak from deep within your soul! You have to send the inaudible message that this topic matters: it’s more important than life itself! You have to be willing to embarrass yourself, to let your emotions spill out and always speak from a perspective of true belief. Visualize, in your mind, a single person who you’re trying to reach: and speak to that person as if it is the most important conversation you’ll ever have. When you have that kind of a connection with your audience: you will savor the time you get to speak to them, and podcasting will allow you to keep that conversation going.

Embrace Evolution

One of my favorite people in the world (and someone who has been podcasting for much longer than I have), Adam Tinkoff (aka The Zen Runner), has redefined his podcasting projects on an almost annual basis. From “Tinkoff Radio” to “Burning Twenty” all the way to his latest podcast “The Slow Runners Club”, Adam has always kept his interest in podcasting fresh and alive by changing formats, programs and mission statements.

With Phedippidations I’ve made subtle changes as well, taking my show from it’s stated “Thoughts, Opinions, Observations and Rambling Diatribes composed during Distance Long Runs” to the current iteration of “Inspirations, motivations, contemplations and conversations for and about runners”.

Podcasting can be a journey not just for your listeners, but for yourself: and you have to be willing to change and evolve what you create; just as you will change as you produce your show.

Push The Boundries and Put Yourself Out There

On the surface, Phedippidations is a podcast about running: but at another (less revealed) level: it’s about living a good life. With that in mind, I sometimes will produce an episode that doesn’t seem to have much to do with running at all.

In episode 235 I took a stand against the Nike Corporation by interviewing the controversial theologian, activist, educator and founder of Educating for Justice, Inc, Jim Keady, who has made it his life’s mission to show how Nike enslaves their workers in third world countries, forcing them to work in sweatshops so that Nike can make billions in profits from their unfair labor practices.

That episode angered a lot of my listeners (many of whom are fans of Nike products) but it also made them think.

Sometimes you have to get a little outrageous and step out of format to make a statement worth hearing. When you ignore the artificial boundaries that you’ve created, your interest in what you’re doing behind the microphone (or camera) will be refreshed and renewed.

Put yourself out there, get angry, scream, cry, laugh, beat your fists: but don’t perform such acts for the purpose of being controversial: BE HONEST and your audience will feel the same fire that you feel. This collective passion will make you eager to speak with your listeners again and again.

That is the magic of podcasting.


If you want to be a part of the Phedippidations community you can follow Steve on Twitter, his Facebook Podcast Page, his website, subscribe to his podcast, or get his podcast app!

Wanna be a part of the incredible runner's community that he has built? Check out the 6th Annual World Wide Festival of Races – A virtual run with fellow runners all over the country that he first started in October of 2005. It’s free, fun and you can run any distance you’re comfortable with! Go to WWFOR.com for more information!